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I wanted to flush the coolant in my 2007 grizzly I just got. I have a gallon sitting around of this stuff, wondering if it would be ok to use? Says it is ok for aluminum engines and is 50/50.

Shoot...won't let me post a link as I'm a new member.

Ok, well it is Zerex G-05 Formula 50/50 pre-mixed. Part number on advance auto is ZXG05RU1



Also wondering what to use for Differentials? I can't find SAE80 anywhere. All I can find is 80W90 or SAE 90. Should I try and find SAE80 or could I use the 80W90 or would it be better to use the SAE 90?

Looking through forums people used 75W90 and all over the place. So a little confused.
 

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Welcome to GC from the Eastern townships in Quebec, Canada.

You can use 80w90 for the differentials. Just make sure it is rated GL-4 or GL-5.
As for coolant, any antifreeze which is good for aluminum engines is ok. I use Prestone 50/50 mix.
 

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I have heard that it’s not a good idea to mix colors of antifreeze. Don’t know how much truth there is to that, though.
 

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Thats why I want to flush it out completely. Why I hate buying used stuff, who knows how it was run or what they used in it. I want to flush out all the fluids and put in what I know is right.
 

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I have heard that it’s not a good idea to mix colors of antifreeze. Don’t know how much truth there is to that, though.
This is because certain coolants will eat seals if not used in the proper system. Mixing causes you to not be able to tell the actual color of the coolant. Or make it not cool effectively. Also if you mix green with red it looks like rust and someone will freak thinking there is rust in the system.

Thats why I want to flush it out completely. Why I hate buying used stuff, who knows how it was run or what they used in it. I want to flush out all the fluids and put in what I know is right.
If it is green and tests good it will be just fine. If you still want to flush that's you choice but I didn't worry about it with mine.
 

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This is because certain coolants will eat seals if not used in the proper system. Mixing causes you to not be able to tell the actual color of the coolant. Or make it not cool effectively.



If it is green and tests good it will be just fine. If you still want to flush that's you choice but I didn't worry about it with mine.

You do not mix coolants simply because they do not mix together. The green (or yellow) kind is silicate based, while the orange (or red, pink, aka: long life) is organic acids based. When these coolants are mixed together, a chemical reaction happens and they turn into a gel. This plugs up the coolant system, and the damage it causes is self explanatory.

You say if it tests good it will be fine. How do you test it? How do you know it's good or not?

The reason why we do coolant changes is because it wears out. Coolants have anti-corrosive additives and lubricants for the water pump. These slowly degrade and disappear over time. Unfortunately most do not do proper coolant changes, but the consequences of not doing them can sometimes take years to show. Corrosion doesn't happen all of sudden. And water pumps take a long time to wear out, even without the lubricants in the coolant.
 

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How do you test it? I would think a Canadian of all people would know how to test coolant. You get a little coolant tester from anywhere that sells oil, coolant etc and test to see how good it is for temperature rating. This usaully tells you the age of the coolant or if someone put to much water in it. If it is good I leave it for a few years. Besides the fact that a good mix will have water for lubrication and enough to cause no serious wear and a water pump to me is a wear part that over time will need replacing. Maybe I am just flat dumb but this has always been my thoughts. Sorry I have never heard of it jelling but I could see that happening. When I mention the "rust" it is when you drain without flushing. Also back in the day people would just color antifreeze a certain color and charge twice the money for it to be model specific.
 

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How do you test it? I would think a Canadian of all people would know how to test coolant. You get a little coolant tester from anywhere that sells oil, coolant etc and test to see how good it is for temperature rating. This usaully tells you the age of the coolant or if someone put to much water in it. If it is good I leave it for a few years. Besides the fact that a good mix will have water for lubrication and enough to cause no serious wear and a water pump to me is a wear part that over time will need replacing. Maybe I am just flat dumb but this has always been my thoughts. Sorry I have never heard of it jelling but I could see that happening. When I mention the "rust" it is when you drain without flushing. Also back in the day people would just color antifreeze a certain color and charge twice the money for it to be model specific.
I understand where your coming from with your train of thought, but those coolant testers you speak of do not tell the condition or age of the coolant. All they do is test for temperature rating or freeze point. The higher the water content, the higher or warmer the freeze point.
There is no coolant "condition" test to be completed outside of having a sample tested in a lab (or at least none that I know of).
Water is not a lubricant either. The coolant itself has the lubricants and (most importantly) anti-corrosive agents. These anti-corrosive agents help stop your radiator, heater core (automotive use), and any other metal parts from corroding from the inside out, this includes the water pump itself.

You are 100% correct on water pumps. Water pumps are wear items and will need to be replaced at some point. But when proper coolant changes are completed, water pump failures happen far less often. They simply last far longer. Some last the life of the vehicle. Proper coolant change intervals are a preventative maintenance item. Just like engine oil. If you don't change your oil as often as you should, then your engine will not last as long.

I also feel a bit of negativity in your last post. I mean no disrespect or anything of that nature. I am simply giving the facts of the matter. Keeping the forum full of correct information so someone else reading it in the future can be properly educated and make they're own decisions based on that. Nothing more.
 

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Hmm. I now have a new thing to research. If there is a way to test coolant age. I realize that you have a good point. Yes I did show a little edge didn't I. I assure you that I was not angry with you. Mostly frustrated as this has been my train of thought for years and never had been questioned till now. Well by anyone who had a reputation for actually being smart. I have said it before I say it again, me and my big mouth. Oh well, the truth of the argument wouldn't have come out if this whole thing didn't go down so at least there is that. Now this all makes sense.

Soooo when do you recommend a coolant change? Also I want to say mix your own antifreeze, it isn't hard to do and it will save you money in the long run.
 

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I recommend coolant change intervals in accordance with the manufacturer....or once every couple years or so for green, or 4-5 years for long life.

I always mix my own anti-freeze, if the concentrated version is available.
 
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