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Discussion Starter #1
Looking into buying a 2019 Grizzly. Whats the best add ons for power? I'll probably stick with the stock bore for now but I don't mind doing a cam. Has anyone done this yet? Any dyno results with Exhaust, intake tuner, cam? Whats the best setup?

Thank you!
 

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Your first mod should be a machined sheave. Then move on to motor mods after that

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There is only so much HP you can get out of a 700cc single without hurting its reliability. Just a fact of life, adding a tuner, exhaust and so on wont net much gains in power, but does make the engine run a bit cooler as you can richen up the fuel mixture.

My 2 cents,
EHS tuner to make it run cooler
Coop machined sheave and then do the secondary spring.
I did the EHS airbox, but only because the stock airbox did a horrible job keeping a tight seal between the filter and box in dusty conditions.


If you are not happy with the power, go buy a renegade 1000R instead.

Dont get me wrong, I love my Grizzly and Kodiak, but they will never win any HP wars, but I will take the reliability over the competition any day. I ride with a few Sportsman 1000's and a couple CanAm 1000's, they wont want to admit it but those machines want to overheat all way too often.
 
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There are plenty of mods you can do to a 700 to get good power increases. Saying that the mods won't add noticeable power because it's a 700 single cylinder is just ridiculous. Sure it won't be a renegade 1000. But I highly doubt he was expecting to bolt on a few parts and have it suddenly become a 1000...

A tuner, pipe, intake, and a cam could easily gain you 20% more hp. Now port it and up the compression and you can see even more gains. It's a raptor 700 motor. One of the most commonly built motors around..

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Sorry I get a lill pissy when people are going on about more power... Probably just came over form someone else posting garbage on Facebook about how come they cant wheelie their grizzly or going on about how their buddies Outty 1000 outruns them all the time...

So if the bike makes 45HP, and you add 20-25% you are still at or under 55HP, when the 850-1000's are putting out 75-90HP stock...
 

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I agree, You can get some serious HP out of the 686cc engine. Look on some of the raptor forums. They are getting close to 75HP out of the 686 engine. But all of that comes at a cost $$$. Realistically. I would do a Fuel controller and a machined sheave with a secondary spring first. Then you can get into dual exhuast, cam, porting, big valves, big bore, stroker crankshaft. If you are planning on doing some thing crazy like big cam, big bore, and a stroker crank you might opt for a PCV fuel controller with timing adjustment over the EHS fuel controller.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the responses.

There are plenty of mods you can do to a 700 to get good power increases. Saying that the mods won't add noticeable power because it's a 700 single cylinder is just ridiculous. Sure it won't be a renegade 1000. But I highly doubt he was expecting to bolt on a few parts and have it suddenly become a 1000...

A tuner, pipe, intake, and a cam could easily gain you 20% more hp. Now port it and up the compression and you can see even more gains. It's a raptor 700 motor. One of the most commonly built motors around..

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
Sorry I get a lill pissy when people are going on about more power... Probably just came over form someone else posting garbage on Facebook about how come they cant wheelie their grizzly or going on about how their buddies Outty 1000 outruns them all the time...

So if the bike makes 45HP, and you add 20-25% you are still at or under 55HP, when the 850-1000's are putting out 75-90HP stock...
I agree, You can get some serious HP out of the 686cc engine. Look on some of the raptor forums. They are getting close to 75HP out of the 686 engine. But all of that comes at a cost $$$. Realistically. I would do a Fuel controller and a machined sheave with a secondary spring first. Then you can get into dual exhuast, cam, porting, big valves, big bore, stroker crankshaft. If you are planning on doing some thing crazy like big cam, big bore, and a stroker crank you might opt for a PCV fuel controller with timing adjustment over the EHS fuel controller.
I appreciate the input. I can assure you that I am not expecting it to keep up with the Outy 1000's. I'm looking for a more nimble machine that I can hop over boulder strewn trails with. I'm primarily looking to see what gets this motor to run strong and hard. Most are a bit stuffed up from the factory. I've always had Can Am in the past so I figured this forum would be the best way to familiarize myself with the best setup for a Grizzly. I'm thinking about picking up a set of elka's for sure. Has anyone tested different exhausts on these? I would love to see which is the best performer.

What is the Sheave?
 

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The 2019s Grizzly are up in horse power around 50 now compared to the 708 48.5 hp,I know my 16 griz with the 708 hit about 62-65 mph and that's plenty fast on 4psi of air in the tires, the trick I feel is to mod your grizzly to get it to top end speed as quickly as possible with the amount of hp you have to work with from the factory, I have to agree with SavageGrizzly on clutching, fuel controller, exhaust mod and air intake mod, there is a lot to be gained here depending on how thick your wallet is, Eric at EHS Racing has gained 10-12 hp with Barkers duals and his controller on the 708 but duals are loud, this proves how choked of these engines are from the factory, now add a machined sheave and purple spring in the secondary to this set up and you would have a very snappy Grizzly with the reliability still there, opening up a new engine for mods I think would risk some reliability for sure and for me to do that I would have to have a reputable atv engine builder do it and that would be costly for the amount of gain you would get on a single, something else that is overlooked when modding is suspension mod to handle higher speeds on the trails, you would be surprised with a Grizzly with stage five shocks tuned for your ride from Elka shocks would out run a stock 1000 canam in the rough washboard and twisties, but would reel you in on the long straight away's maybe, most trail riders are between 25-45 mph on the trail and the stock Grizzly can sure handle that with ease.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The 2019s Grizzly are up in horse power around 50 now compared to the 708 48.5 hp,I know my 16 griz with the 708 hit about 62-65 mph and that's plenty fast on 4psi of air in the tires, the trick I feel is to mod your grizzly to get it to top end speed as quickly as possible with the amount of hp you have to work with from the factory, I have to agree with SavageGrizzly on clutching, fuel controller, exhaust mod and air intake mod, there is a lot to be gained here depending on how thick your wallet is, Eric at EHS Racing has gained 10-12 hp with Barkers duals and his controller on the 708 but duals are loud, this proves how choked of these engines are from the factory, now add a machined sheave and purple spring in the secondary to this set up and you would have a very snappy Grizzly with the reliability still there, opening up a new engine for mods I think would risk some reliability for sure and for me to do that I would have to have a reputable atv engine builder do it and that would be costly for the amount of gain you would get on a single, something else that is overlooked when modding is suspension mod to handle higher speeds on the trails, you would be surprised with a Grizzly with stage five shocks tuned for your ride from Elka shocks would out run a stock 1000 canam in the rough washboard and twisties, but would reel you in on the long straight away's maybe, most trail riders are between 25-45 mph on the trail and the stock Grizzly can sure handle that with ease.
Thanks for the response. I'm not looking for speed as much as the hit and acceleration. I ride very light on the front in some of these trails. My goal is to get a machine that has the response to lighten the front to hop over boulders, logs or drops. I've put barkers on my other machines, I like them a lot. Hopefully the 686 motor responds as well as the 708.

I think I am going to pull the trigger on the grizzly. I'll give Eric a call to see what he's using for the 686 tuner. Thank you.
 

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As far as the Cutch machined sheave for the Griz look up Coops 45 on youtube Arnie has a great vid on it. hope this helps
 
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As far as the Cutch machined sheave for the Griz look up Coops 45 on youtube Arnie has a great vid on it. hope this helps

X2 on above and talk to Arnie on which secondary spring to use for what ever size of tires you are going to run. A fuel controller, exhaust tip, sheave mod and secondary spring will make it run a ton better than stock. Look up EHS racing on Youtube for a fuel controller and pipe info.
 

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X3

I run an Arnie Cooper machined sheave on my little 550 Grizz for many thousands of kilometres with excellent results.
 

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Clutch mods are a great place to start and exhaust as well. But what type of riding are you wanting to do? What kind of tire and size are you going with? That would help with trying to tell you more specifically on how to set the clutch up. Perhaps you try slugs for your wet clutch as well.
 

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Grizzly 708

I have a 2016 Grizzly with an HMF Quiet series and their tuner on it and I have never wanted more power. I ride in West Virginia as well as in ohio and on those somewhat tight technical trails, I can easily keep up with the guys on the bigger more powerful bikes. They will get you on the straights but anything over 30 for me on rocky bumpy trails in more than I am comfortable with.

I am a bigger rider at around 330 and I can make it up any hill with ease in hi range.



I have a set of ELKA stage 1s on my bike and they were a good improvement over stock.
 

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Thanks for the response. I'm not looking for speed as much as the hit and acceleration. I ride very light on the front in some of these trails. My goal is to get a machine that has the response to lighten the front to hop over boulders, logs or drops. I've put barkers on my other machines, I like them a lot. Hopefully the 686 motor responds as well as the 708.

I think I am going to pull the trigger on the grizzly. I'll give Eric a call to see what he's using for the 686 tuner. Thank you.

Yeah, I run the Coop45 machined sheave with an additional 0.75mm shim and then EPI Purple spring, works great to gain acceleration and low end torque. I very seldom use low range anymore. I did end up switching the 18G weights for a set that are technically 21.4G each as to adjust my cruising RPM down just a little bit at 25-30MPH to regain some mileage.

Here is some other stuff I posted that might be useful when it comes to tuning your CVT:
https://www.grizzlycentral.com/forum/grizzly-engine-transmission/109645-clutch-weights.html#post1085357


I personally believe starting with good tires and working over the CVT is the first things to do. Throw on an EHS tuner to richen up the mixture some and go put some miles on. After a few hundred miles you will know what to work on next based on your riding style and location. What works for me may not be what is right for you.
 
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I went with the EHS controller, EPI purple and grizzly rollers in my 19 kodiak and had planned to send the sheave to Arnie but it’s my wife’s bike and she already complains it’s too snappy so I’m gonna leave it as is, biggest improvement was the EHS box, really added power everywhere and cooled things down too, fan used to come on constantly now she’s cool and quiet.
 

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Anyone remember what size the nut is that holds the spring on the secondary sheave? I thought I read somewhere that it is 46mm, but that seam quite large.
 

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You will need a 22mm deep well to remove both the primary and secondary sheaves. The spring retainer nut on the back of the secondary is a 45mm, but a 1 13/16" will work also.
 
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You will need a 22mm deep well to remove both the primary and secondary sheaves. The spring retainer nut on the back of the secondary is a 45mm, but a 1 13/16" will work also.
Thank you
 

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You my find this helpful: 65 ft lbs for spring nut
72 ft lbs for secondary nut
100 ft lbs for primary nut
 
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