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Looking to buy new quad and these are the 2 I got in mind .. the only thing that make me want to go honda again is I can get their financing to 3% and yamaha is 9 % .... i love my 2009 grizzly but I'm sick of doubling the wife and looking to add another atv in my garage lol. What's ur guys opinion on that new rubicon 500
 

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I would say ride them both and see what you think. My experience the Honda is a very reliable quad but not as comfortable and capable on the trails and mud. Not saying it's bad just not as good. It also fits people differently. The Grizzly is more sporty feeling and fits my frame better than the Honda. I am 6 foot and about 235lbs and the Honda just feels like I am slouching a bit and slightly cramped.
 

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Well thanks for your input big guy ! I've rode a 01 rubicon and it rode like a wheel barrel haha . But I'm sure 01 to 19 is a huge difference I'll see if yamaha can match honda hehe
 

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I was a Honda guy for a long time. It was a night and day difference when I rode a Grizzly. Now, we’re talking 07ish models here... I can tell you that Honda is bulllet proof but so is Yamaha. Honda has traditionally been “geared” (see what I did there? lol) toward work where the Griz is a work and play machine. If you look at some of the recent Dirt Trax livestream vids, you’ll find they agree and they get paid to talk good on Honda. I agree with the comments above. Ride both and see what works best for you. You are on a Yamaha site so the opinions here will most likely lean toward Yamaha. But I can tell you that I ride a Yamaha for a reason... Several, in fact.
1- It’s sportier but does work as well as a Honda.
2- Much easier and cheaper to adjust the low end to compensate for larger, heavier tires.
3- Yamaha reliability. (This one is equal to Honda IMO.)
4- Easier to work on / maintain. (Again, I’m going off my old 07 Rubi. It was a pain in the azzzz. Cartridge oil filter and TWO drain plugs!!!)
5- Looks. The Griz wins in this catagory IMO.
7- We have the better forum by far!! Spend a month over there and here and see who is more helpful without any BS. (Disclaimer- We can’t be held liable for the dent in your bank account that this forum has been known to cause. We love mods!!!!)
8- CVT transmission. The Yamaha CVT simply can’t be beat and we can tell you simple and cheap ways to mod it with no loss in reliability.
9- Comfort. The Griz has the most comfortable seat I have been on. That’s important if you’re putting in a ton of miles in a day. Eventually, you’re going to sit down and you don’t want it to feel like concrete when you do!
If I were buying new today, it would be a 2019 EPS Griz. If I were buying used, it would be a clean 14, 15 or 17+. Hands down, no discussion! I wouldn’t necessarily avoid an 16 but I’d make dang sure the decompression spring update had been done and that the air intake was clean. These were just growing pains with the new 708 motor and new air filter setup.
 

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This is somewhat a tough call in my opinion. The Honda Rubicon is the ONLY Honda ATV that I would consider purchasing in Honda's complete lineup.

In 2015, Honda released a completely new Rubicon 500. It was the most significant model release Honda has done in decades, again in my opinion. You really can't compare it against anything else in Honda's lineup before or since. It's simply a great ATV with IRS and front diff lock.

Now would I consider the Rubicon over the Grizzly 700? I doubt it.

But like others have said, try them both and pick what suits you. Both are great ATV's that will give you years of service. You really can't go wrong with either choice.
 

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@Steffy which Rubicon are you considering, the DCT or the footshift? I have a few things to say but will hold off until you narrow that down.
 

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My brother has a 2015 Honda Rubicon with the electronic auto shift that he is selling. I rode it before I bought my Grizzly. I rode it a few times and had fun. I actually liked the way it felt and handled. I haven't ridden it since I bought my 2017 Grizzly though.

From what I've heard from talking to people and read online, I believe Honda is the most reliable machine you could possibly buy. Yamaha is right up there with Honda too. I think since the Honda has gears instead of a CVT, it would be a great work machine, primarily, and an OK trail rider second. If I had a farm and needed it for a working machine or needed hauling things around, I think the Honda Rubicon would be great.

But, this is what I didn't like:
1) The transmission shifted abruptly (more noticeable from 1st to 2nd to 3rd (especially when it was cold). This is also the primary reason why my sister-in-law didn't like it and why my brother is selling it.
2) In auto mode, the transmission shifted to a higher gear too early for me and I wasn't able to stay in the powerband as long as I wanted for the "spirited" type of riding that I do.
3) Not enough power for me. Enough said.
4) It is difficult to go into reverse. Going into reverse is a bit wonky. However, I am sure if I rode it more, I could get used to it.

Hope this helps!
 

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I love my 2009 grizzly but I'm sick of doubling the wife and looking to add another atv in my garage lol. What's ur guys opinion on that new rubicon 500
Have you considered looking at the 2019 Kodiak 700 EPS as well? Has a slightly smaller footprint and better turning radius than the Grizzly so it might suit her better than a Grizzly.
 

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I just did this same research 3 months ago and landed on a 2018 Grizzly eps SE. Deciding factor for me was diff locker. Honda has limited slip in both diffs and grizz has a front locker. (which has saved the day once already)
 

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The 708cc has been flawless btw. Plenty of power and mine uses zero oil. I've seen folks on here saying oil consumption was an issue.
 

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Hey...Steffy...Welcome to GC from Wisconsin.

First off this is a Yamaha forum...??

If you wife is smaller, 5'-6" or less the Kodiak is the machine she will want. It is built on a frame similar in size to the 2013 Griz. They are about 3" shorter in seat height. The Kodi's are great stable machines. Easy to drive and shift. The diff lock is available but not really needed, except in very deep mud. Save the cash and buy a winch you need a winch anyway.

A friend bought a Hondo for his self and his wife. He complained that it always seemed to be searching for the right gear. The reverse lock out is like a "Bar Puzzle". His wife had small hands so she had to use both hands to get it into reverse. Their auto tranny is prone to electric gremlins. The computer pops up a change oil light every 600 miles.

We have 2 Kodi's. Change the roller weights to 20g weight makes them like a "Sporter-ized" Grizzlies.
 

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Looking to buy new quad and these are the 2 I got in mind .. the only thing that make me want to go honda again is I can get their financing to 3% and yamaha is 9 % .... i love my 2009 grizzly but I'm sick of doubling the wife and looking to add another atv in my garage lol. What's ur guys opinion on that new rubicon 500
Forget the Yamaha financing. My Yamaha dealer put me in local Credit Union financing and I'm in the 3's for a rate on my 2018 Griz. There are many banks and Credit Unions that have Powersport/ Motorcycle financing. Check with your dealer!

On the Machines, I agree with Dirt Trax Online that Honda is a very reliable vehicle, equal to Yamaha IMHO, but they don't innovate as much as Yamaha (Yamaha is slow enough as is, LOL). On the spec sheet they are similar but not as capable as the Griz. Of course, I'm bias (see picture included) so take it with a grain of salt!
 

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I was a Honda guy also and was deciding on either the 500 Rubicon deluxe or the 700 grizzly se, I went with the Grizzly only because the price was abit cheaper and Yamaha service was more closer to my home, both bikes are very nice and the ride I found was close with Yamaha being abit more comfy, one thing that stuck out and noticed right away is the Grizz is much louder to ride than the Rubicon also you will find the Rubicon is very good on fuel compared to the Grizz, I am very happy with my Grizz and have a great Yamaha service shop close to home which was the deciding factor on why I went with Yamaha in the end.
 

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Looking to buy new quad and these are the 2 I got in mind .. the only thing that make me want to go honda again is I can get their financing to 3% and yamaha is 9 % .... i love my 2009 grizzly but I'm sick of doubling the wife and looking to add another atv in my garage lol. What's ur guys opinion on that new rubicon 500
First, I agree with Reogem on the size and to consider the Kodiak 70 as well, and if you are even considering a Rubicon (which is only 475cc and 28hp), might as well throw the new Kodiak 450 into the mix as it actually stacks up most similar to the Rubicon.

Well thanks for your input big guy ! I've rode a 01 rubicon and it rode like a wheel barrel haha . But I'm sure 01 to 19 is a huge difference I'll see if yamaha can match honda hehe
Huge difference is correct. The -01-’04 Rubicons were SRA and full time 4x4 with hydrostatic tranny only, carb’d. The ’05-’14 added 2x4/4x4 switch. The ‘15+ are the EFI, DCT/footshift, diff-lock, IRS, brand new model.

My brother has a 2015 Honda Rubicon with the electronic auto shift that he is selling. I rode it before I bought my Grizzly. I rode it a few times and had fun. I actually liked the way it felt and handled. I haven't ridden it since I bought my 2017 Grizzly though.

From what I've heard from talking to people and read online, I believe Honda is the most reliable machine you could possibly buy. Yamaha is right up there with Honda too. I think since the Honda has gears instead of a CVT, it would be a great work machine, primarily, and an OK trail rider second. If I had a farm and needed it for a working machine or needed hauling things around, I think the Honda Rubicon would be great.

But, this is what I didn't like:
1) The transmission shifted abruptly (more noticeable from 1st to 2nd to 3rd (especially when it was cold). This is also the primary reason why my sister-in-law didn't like it and why my brother is selling it.
2) In auto mode, the transmission shifted to a higher gear too early for me and I wasn't able to stay in the powerband as long as I wanted for the "spirited" type of riding that I do.
3) Not enough power for me. Enough said.
4) It is difficult to go into reverse. Going into reverse is a bit wonky. However, I am sure if I rode it more, I could get used to it.

Hope this helps!
1) Abrupt shifting in the DCT Rubicon, yes. But not for the footshift model.
4) For the reverse being wonky, I make comment to that below.

I just did this same research 3 months ago and landed on a 2018 Grizzly eps SE. Deciding factor for me was diff locker. Honda has limited slip in both diffs and grizz has a front locker. (which has saved the day once already)
The Honda actually has a locked rear diff just like Yamaha, and the 2015+ Rubicon has front diff-lock as well. Their switch is actually nicer and takes one less hand action than Yamaha’s diff-lock switch.

you will find the Rubicon is very good on fuel compared to the Grizz
Yep, can hold the Honda's in a high gear ratio for cruising and sip the fuel if you want. Grizz's can have heavier primary rollers put in to help with this, but can't match the low rpm of the Honda.

Hey...Steffy...Welcome to GC from Wisconsin.

First off this is a Yamaha forum...??

If you wife is smaller, 5'-6" or less the Kodiak is the machine she will want. It is built on a frame similar in size to the 2013 Griz. They are about 3" shorter in seat height. The Kodi's are great stable machines. Easy to drive and shift. The diff lock is available but not really needed, except in very deep mud. Save the cash and buy a winch you need a winch anyway.

A friend bought a Hondo for his self and his wife. He complained that it always seemed to be searching for the right gear. The reverse lock out is like a "Bar Puzzle". His wife had small hands so she had to use both hands to get it into reverse. Their auto tranny is prone to electric gremlins. The computer pops up a change oil light every 600 miles.

We have 2 Kodi's. Change the roller weights to 20g weight makes them like a "Sporter-ized" Grizzlies.
I currently have more Honda’s in the family than we do Yamaha’s, and have no problem in the Honda forum laying out the facts about how great the Grizz’s and Kodiak’s are.

The Honda reverse being tricky is a non-issue though. Every Honda we own has the override done on it, and even with that you still can’t shift it into R until you are stopped anyway. The override is done simply by putting a zip-tie between the perch and R lever around the inner cable.

Also, the electrical gremlins that reogem mentioned are true. But they are not super common for the DCT’s, and keep in mind that ONLY applies to the DCT Rubicon’s. Everyone not familiar with the Honda lineup tends to forget they have a traditional footshift transmission available in the Rubicon. That is actually the base model and includes EPS. But footshift is not the way of the industry anymore, though you could argue that with the footshift transmission you get even more reliability than a Yamaha Ultramatic. The footshift Rubicon still has IRS, EPS, EFI, diff-lock, etc.

I didn't make this post to try to convince one way or the other. If I were in steffy's shoes, I would go for one of the Kodiak's. But I did feel it would be fair to set some facts straight about the Rubicon.
 

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If your credit will get you approved at 3% from Honda, then your credit will get you approved at 3% from a lender that finances Yamahas.
 

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I was a Honda guy for a long time. It was a night and day difference when I rode a Grizzly. Now, we’re talking 07ish models here... I can tell you that Honda is bulllet proof but so is Yamaha. Honda has traditionally been “geared” (see what I did there? lol) toward work where the Griz is a work and play machine. If you look at some of the recent Dirt Trax livestream vids, you’ll find they agree and they get paid to talk good on Honda. I agree with the comments above. Ride both and see what works best for you. You are on a Yamaha site so the opinions here will most likely lean toward Yamaha. But I can tell you that I ride a Yamaha for a reason... Several, in fact.
1- It’s sportier but does work as well as a Honda.
2- Much easier and cheaper to adjust the low end to compensate for larger, heavier tires.
3- Yamaha reliability. (This one is equal to Honda IMO.)
4- Easier to work on / maintain. (Again, I’m going off my old 07 Rubi. It was a pain in the azzzz. Cartridge oil filter and TWO drain plugs!!!)
5- Looks. The Griz wins in this catagory IMO.
7- We have the better forum by far!! Spend a month over there and here and see who is more helpful without any BS. (Disclaimer- We can’t be held liable for the dent in your bank account that this forum has been known to cause. We love mods!!!!)
8- CVT transmission. The Yamaha CVT simply can’t be beat and we can tell you simple and cheap ways to mod it with no loss in reliability.
9- Comfort. The Griz has the most comfortable seat I have been on. That’s important if you’re putting in a ton of miles in a day. Eventually, you’re going to sit down and you don’t want it to feel like concrete when you do!
If I were buying new today, it would be a 2019 EPS Griz. If I were buying used, it would be a clean 14, 15 or 17+. Hands down, no discussion! I wouldn’t necessarily avoid an 16 but I’d make dang sure the decompression spring update had been done and that the air intake was clean. These were just growing pains with the new 708 motor and new air filter setup.
I feel it necessary to modify one of my above statements. I would avoid a16-18 with the 708 motor. This is just my opinion resulting from discussions I’ve had with other members regarding reliability of the motor. Some have reported the motor inexplicably using oil while at least one I’m aware of has had to rebuild the motor. Nobody likes to hear bad things about their machine and this is only my opinion. So if I were to spend my money on a new or new old stock machine today it would be in a 2019 or leftover 2015 (if and of those still exist). lol
 

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I feel it necessary to modify one of my above statements. I would avoid a16-18 with the 708 motor. This is just my opinion resulting from discussions I’ve had with other members regarding reliability of the motor. Some have reported the motor inexplicably using oil while at least one I’m aware of has had to rebuild the motor. Nobody likes to hear bad things about their machine and this is only my opinion. So if I were to spend my money on a new or new old stock machine today it would be in a 2019 or leftover 2015 (if and of those still exist). lol
I have a 2018 Griz 708. Granted it's new as of 4/2018 so it's a short time for opinions, but I've put 2,250 miles on it since May 2018. No issue yet. Been running great and no complaints. Love this thing! But 1 example does not make a good sample size. But I'm still in love!
 

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I feel it necessary to modify one of my above statements. I would avoid a16-18 with the 708 motor. This is just my opinion resulting from discussions I’ve had with other members regarding reliability of the motor. Some have reported the motor inexplicably using oil while at least one I’m aware of has had to rebuild the motor. Nobody likes to hear bad things about their machine and this is only my opinion. So if I were to spend my money on a new or new old stock machine today it would be in a 2019 or leftover 2015 (if and of those still exist). lol
Agreed. I have no personal experience with the 708 motors, but I'm kinda turned off by them, aspecially the 2016 models. My interest remain on the more tried and true bullet proof reputation of the 686s.
 

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I feel it necessary to modify one of my above statements. I would avoid a16-18 with the 708 motor. This is just my opinion resulting from discussions I’ve had with other members regarding reliability of the motor. Some have reported the motor inexplicably using oil while at least one I’m aware of has had to rebuild the motor. Nobody likes to hear bad things about their machine and this is only my opinion. So if I were to spend my money on a new or new old stock machine today it would be in a 2019 or leftover 2015 (if and of those still exist). lol

I own a 2017 and though it dont have many miles on it yet, still no issues. One thing you need to remember is we here about the bad on the forums. How many of these 708's were sold that we never here about?? 100,000?? The only 708 I would stay away from is the 2016 only because of possible getting a early model that had bad valve guides.
 

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I own a 2017 and though it dont have many miles on it yet, still no issues. One thing you need to remember is we here about the bad on the forums. How many of these 708's were sold that we never here about?? 100,000?? The only 708 I would stay away from is the 2016 only because of possible getting a early model that had bad valve guides.
And where was everybody in 2007 when the 686 was having its growing pains?
You may not think they were very common, but there were plenty of problems. In reality, what wasn't very common in 2007 was the internet at your fingertips on your smart phone and the plethora of social media outlets to complain about your problems on, and the millions of other people with their phone at the ready to repeat the complaint that they heard.

My '17 708 has been a perfect specimen, by the way.
 
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