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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

First post so please excuse any ignorance on my part. I am looking into buying 4 new tires for my 2020 Grizzly 700 SE and am thinking about going with a square set up like others on this form have. I like the Idea of having one spare tire that I can swap out back at camp if needed and being able rotate. Right now I am leaning toward a bias ply tire " I know not the best riding/wearing". I have the stock Maxis tires on right now "bias ply" and have had to plug the tire side wall 2 times now and they are still holding air and to my surprise have taken some abuse post sidewall damage without leaking much. I ordered a 6in patch am going to try it and see if holds "snake bite puncture". I am currently looking at Carlisle AT489XL tires in either a 26x9x12 or a 27x9x12. Tires are both stated to weigh around 19lbs so comparatively with most radials much lighter. I also like running a round profile tire as opposed to most radials that are square. I will however either need to buy 4 new aftermarket rims or maybe order 2 new front rims and just run them in the rear. Would prefer to keep the stock rims as I like the look.

My questions are
- What are the stock rims F/R width and offset
- What do the stock tires weigh MU05Y and MU06Y
- If I run 2 new front rims in the rear will I need any hub spacers to keep the rear width close to stock
- any helpful input or suggestions

Thank you,
 

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Hello,

First post so please excuse any ignorance on my part. I am looking into buying 4 new tires for my 2020 Grizzly 700 SE and am thinking about going with a square set up like others on this form have. I like the Idea of having one spare tire that I can swap out back at camp if needed and being able rotate. Right now I am leaning toward a bias ply tire " I know not the best riding/wearing". I have the stock Maxis tires on right now "bias ply" and have had to plug the tire side wall 2 times now and they are still holding air and to my surprise have taken some abuse post sidewall damage without leaking much. I ordered a 6in patch am going to try it and see if holds "snake bite puncture". I am currently looking at Carlisle AT489XL tires in either a 26x9x12 or a 27x9x12. Tires are both stated to weigh around 19lbs so comparatively with most radials much lighter. I also like running a round profile tire as opposed to most radials that are square. I will however either need to buy 4 new aftermarket rims or maybe order 2 new front rims and just run them in the rear. Would prefer to keep the stock rims as I like the look.

My questions are
- What are the stock rims F/R width and offset
- What do the stock tires weigh MU05Y and MU06Y
- If I run 2 new front rims in the rear will I need any hub spacers to keep the rear width close to stock
- any helpful input or suggestions

Thank you,
If you get new front wheels for the rear, NO spacers are required....
I've Been running four factory front wheels (12x6") all around for over a year and 2500 miles
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you get new front wheels for the rear, NO spacers are required....
I've Been running four factory front wheels (12x6") all around for over a year and 2500 miles
I see you have done something similar with the stock rims, did you notice any decrease in rear track width?
 

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2021 Grizzly SE, 2018 Kodiak 700 SE
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I would look into a tire like the ITP Blackwater Evolution. They are a great all around tire, wear well are an 8 ply radials with rim guard and have a round profile.
 

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I would look into a tire like the ITP Blackwater Evolution. They are a great all around tire, wear well are an 8 ply radials with rim guard and have a round profile.
I like the look of the blackwaters, but the countless horrible reviews across all the atv forums steered me away from them.

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Hello,

First post so please excuse any ignorance on my part. I am looking into buying 4 new tires for my 2020 Grizzly 700 SE and am thinking about going with a square set up like others on this form have. I like the Idea of having one spare tire that I can swap out back at camp if needed and being able rotate. Right now I am leaning toward a bias ply tire " I know not the best riding/wearing". I have the stock Maxis tires on right now "bias ply" and have had to plug the tire side wall 2 times now and they are still holding air and to my surprise have taken some abuse post sidewall damage without leaking much. I ordered a 6in patch am going to try it and see if holds "snake bite puncture". I am currently looking at Carlisle AT489XL tires in either a 26x9x12 or a 27x9x12. Tires are both stated to weigh around 19lbs so comparatively with most radials much lighter. I also like running a round profile tire as opposed to most radials that are square. I will however either need to buy 4 new aftermarket rims or maybe order 2 new front rims and just run them in the rear. Would prefer to keep the stock rims as I like the look.

My questions are
  • What are the stock rims F/R width and offset
  • What do the stock tires weigh MU05Y and MU06Y
  • If I run 2 new front rims in the rear will I need any hub spacers to keep the rear width close to stock
  • any helpful input or suggestions

Thank you,
The round profile of the tire isn't determined by bias or radial. It's just the design by the manufacturer. You can get bias knockoff Bighorns that are as flat as can be. Then look at radial like the Blackwater evos, as mentioned, very round profile.


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I like the look of the blackwaters, but the countless horrible reviews across all the atv forums steered me away from them.

Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
I have a few thousand miles on them all over northeast Ohio and Hatfield/McCoy with no issues at all. I like them enough to get a second set for my Grizzly.
 

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I have a few thousand miles on them all over northeast Ohio and Hatfield/McCoy with no issues at all. I like them enough to get a second set for my Grizzly.
That's good to hear, I almost pulled the trigger on a set. It was just the majority of negative feedback vs positive. Nice to see someone with more positive feedback.
I ended up going with Reptile Radials, man these things are awesome.

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Discussion Starter #10
The round profile of the tire isn't determined by bias or radial. It's just the design by the manufacturer. You can get bias knockoff Bighorns that are as flat as can be. Then look at radial like the Blackwater evos, as mentioned, very round profile.


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Thanks for the info CanadianKodiak700, but I really am impressed with the way the factory bias ply tires have held up with 2 1in gashes on the sidewalls in them with nothing but plugs. I have tried to repair some of my jeep tires Radial like that in the past and the rips usually just tear more when you try to apply any real TQ on them after being plugged. I really ripped around on the stock tire with these plugs its just crazy how well its held up. I am also trying to keep the weight as low as possible, and most radials seem to be at least 5 lbs heavier per tire many going much heaver. I really want to keep the snappy acceleration the bike has.
 

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Your overall diameter is going to play a much larger factor than a few pounds of weight when it comes to your "snappiness".

If you go with a good radial tire, you will get a much stronger casing, that is much more resistant to punctures. Plugging the sidewall of any tire, radial or bias is a poor decision. Sidewalls are designed to flex and it usually results in a plug leaking, or if you actually patch it, it reduces the flex and will generate heat in the casing speeding up your failure.

Any tire you replace the OEM tires with will be a much better choice, but a radial will last much longer and be a tougher tire

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Discussion Starter #12
Your overall diameter is going to play a much larger factor than a few pounds of weight when it comes to your "snappiness".

If you go with a good radial tire, you will get a much stronger casing, that is much more resistant to punctures. Plugging the sidewall of any tire, radial or bias is a poor decision. Sidewalls are designed to flex and it usually results in a plug leaking, or if you actually patch it, it reduces the flex and will generate heat in the casing speeding up your failure.

Any tire you replace the OEM tires with will be a much better choice, but a radial will last much longer and be a tougher tire

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I can appreciate the increased tread puncture resistance, and cant lie that the tire response on radials and their longer life does appeal to me. My other radial candidate was the keenda bear claw evo. For a 26x9x12 at 22lbs. I do want to keep rotating weight down to a min for acceleration and its effects on the driveline but understand angular tq and how the radius of the tire effects it. Also its sprung weight and that does have an impact on the stock shock valving.

Long story short i am willing to trade on a few things to get a lighter tire that is easily trail repairable and that has me gravitating toward a bias ply
 

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I can appreciate the increased tread puncture resistance, and cant lie that the tire response on radials and their longer life does appeal to me. My other radial candidate was the keenda bear claw evo. For a 26x9x12 at 22lbs. I do want to keep rotating weight down to a min for acceleration and its effects on the driveline but understand angular tq and how the radius of the tire effects it. Also its sprung weight and that does have an impact on the stock shock valving.

Long story short i am willing to trade on a few things to get a lighter tire that is easily trail repairable and that has me gravitating toward a bias ply
No worries, your bike, your money. You come here for suggestions and info. We offer all our years of experience. What you do with the info is up to you.
Just saying, many of us here have discovered unsprung weight doesn't play as big a part as you think. A few extra lbs isn't as noticable as the majority of the unsprung weight way out on larger tires.
Personally, I'll take a tire that will handle better, last longer, and will rarely need to be repaired, over a tire that will need frequently repaired in the trail.
As for ease of repair, there is no difference, plus go in the hole the same way.... If done right, and if it's repairable damage.

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I see you have done something similar with the stock rims, did you notice any decrease in rear track width?
Some, but it's not noticeable. I've switched from 9" to 11" back 9" rears tires often as I had both staggered and square set up of pitbull growlers on wheels ... I'm sold the fatty rears and only run 26 x 9" Growlers at all four corners. I'm very happy with it! It's amazing what I can drive threw in 2 wd!
 
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