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Discussion Starter #1
I am wondering what the build quality is like on the 700 engines. A friend of mine had a Grizzly 450 years ago and i think he ended up drowning it out and had to rebuild the top end. He took the new piston and jug to a machine shop and had it bored out and slapped it back together and it did not last long. I am still uncertain as to what went wrong with it but i think he told me that the jug did not have a steel sleeve in it. I think it was all aluminum with a Nikasil coating. Ad i think where he went wrong was he only had the jug bored out and did not have it Nikasil coated.

My old 2007 Suzuki Vinson has a sleeve and the sleeve has Nikasil coating and it runs like the first day i bought it. It's nice to know it has a steel sleeve in it and a Nikasil coating i think the engine will last forever with regular oil changes. It also holds 4 quarts of oil which seems like overkill but seems beneficial to longer engine life.

I am just wondering how the 700's are built and how much life is in them. I heard a rumor years ago that Yamaha was contracting some of their engines to be built in China. Not sure if that is true or not but i know nothing is built as well as it used to be I'm not bashing Yamaha just wondering.
 

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Never heard anything to support the claim that Yamaha had a Made in China 700 engine ..

2007-2008 are generally regarded as good motors minus stators burn out issues. The later years have an updated cover that uses oil to cool down the stators.

The best seem to be 2009 to 2015 686cc. 14-15 being a revamp version with updates piston, cylinder head , exhaust system and fuel mapping

2016 - 2018 708cc are entirely different platform with DOHC. They were apparently made under devision of Subaru . Many have had great luck with these, but documented oil burning issues plague some..


2019 and later are basically identical to the bullet prof 2014- 2015 version of the 686cc and we hope will prove as durable, and reliable.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Never heard anything to support the claim that Yamaha had a Made in China 700 engine ..

2007-2008 are generally regarded as good motors minus stators burn out issues. The later years have an updated cover that uses oil to cool down the stators.

The best seem to be 2009 to 2015 686cc. 14-15 being a revamp version with updates piston, cylinder head , exhaust system and fuel mapping

2016 - 2018 708cc are entirely different platform with DOHC. They were apparently made under devision of Subaru . Many have had great luck with these, but documented oil burning issues plague some..


2019 and later are basically identical to the bullet prof 2014- 2015 version of the 686cc and we hope will prove as durable, and reliable.

Good to know the new engines seem to be well made. I know my Suzuki Vinson had it's problems as well. One of them was if the battery did not have enough power to spin the starter over easily it would torque a gear in the engine housing and bust the gear off. The only way to fix it was a new engine case. So i was always sure to keep the battery charged and if the battery got weak i replaced it. I have never had that problem because i made sure to avoid it.
 

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It's sleeved, 2011 was the last year they were made in Japan. I'm over 10k miles trouble free.
 

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I was was one of those oil burners 2016 was rebuilt 2 times since July of this year first time dealer nicked the ring on a jug piston recall. Just got it back a week or so ago and have only put 10 or 15 miles on it . New valve guides ,seals and new fuel pump and piston and rings this time . Keeping my fingers crossed only 756 miles onit ! 10 grand for a machine and i had to deal with this ?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
2011 was the last year they were made in Japan.
I looked into where Suzuki built their ATV and it seems they went to American production in 2001. Japan built stuff seems to have much better quality than American built. Back in the 2000's all of my friends owned 500cc polarises and they were absolute garbage. The only thing that was well built on them was the engines and come to find out the 500cc engines were built by a Japanese company called Fuji in Japan. I wish Japanese power sports companies would have kept their production in Japan.
 

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"Japan built stuff seems to have much better quality than American built."

Agreed. The 2011 model Grizzly was the last year of that generation. The previous bugs of that generation had been addressed and fixed for 2011 such as the big E instrument cluster fail, over heating stator, faulty roll over valve, boiling gas issue, vented corroded EPS unit, etc.
In 2012 to present they started making them in America with issues like ball joints failing, decompression springs failing, seats falling off, oil burning 708, defective hubs "wheel bearing bore too deep", and faulty 4 wheel drive switch to name a few.
If I could find another 2011 in pristine condition I'd probably buy it even though I really don't need it. Over 10k miles on mine with no issues at all. I've never even adjusted the valves, just routine maintenance and wear and tear items.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
"Japan built stuff seems to have much better quality than American built."

Agreed. The 2011 model Grizzly was the last year of that generation. The previous bugs of that generation had been addressed and fixed for 2011 such as the big E instrument cluster fail, over heating stator, faulty roll over valve, boiling gas issue, vented corroded EPS unit, etc.
In 2012 to present they started making them in America with issues like ball joints failing, decompression springs failing, seats falling off, oil burning 708, defective hubs "wheel bearing bore too deep", and faulty 4 wheel drive switch to name a few.
If I could find another 2011 in pristine condition I'd probably buy it even though I really don't need it. Over 10k miles on mine with no issues at all. I've never even adjusted the valves, just routine maintenance and wear and tear items.

Well that dont inspire my confidence in buying a 2021 Grizzly...
 

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Well that dont inspire my confidence in buying a 2021 Grizzly...
None of the issues mentioned above have shown to be present in the 2019 and later models.... Minus the crummy air filter set up witch is easy to deal with... So don't let yourself get scared off for nothing.
 

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Well that dont inspire my confidence in buying a 2021 Grizzly...
None of the issues mentioned above have shown to be present in the 2019 and later models.... So don't let yourself get scared off for nothing.
Yeah, just do your research because they are getting better. This site has a ton of information. It's where I get my knowledge about the issues. The Grizzly is still number one but the Suzuki King Quad is another to consider.

IIRC, apparently the seat is still an issue, and heat is an issue due to a lean fuel mixture and catalytic converter.
A lot of new Grizzly owners add an aftermarket fuel programmer for a richer fuel mix and seem pretty satisfied overall.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
None of the issues mentioned above have shown to be present in the 2019 and later models.... Minus the crummy air filter set up witch is easy to deal with... So don't let yourself get scared off for nothing.
What is required to fix the air filter?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yeah, just do your research because they are getting better. This site has a ton of information. It's where I get my knowledge about the issues. The Grizzly is still number one but the Suzuki King Quad is another to consider.

IIRC, apparently the seat is still an issue, and heat is an issue due to a lean fuel mixture and catalytic converter.
A lot of new Grizzly owners add an aftermarket fuel programmer for a richer fuel mix and seem pretty satisfied overall.
And how much is a programmer? I just wanted to buy this thing and ride it not be forced to buy a bunch of aftermarket parts to fix it.
 

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And how much is a programmer? I just wanted to buy this thing and ride it not be forced to buy a bunch of aftermarket parts to fix it.
200$ US from EHS

I didn't find my 2019 grizzly needed a programmer. It doesn't run any hotter then my 2009 grizzly..

I've since modified my spark arrester / tip assembly and appreciate the tuner for the extra priece of mind. Mine is set on the low side (minimal fuel addition)

In stock form, not required.
 

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So what is required to fix the factory air filter?
All I did was grease the foam donut, and made a shim out of a margarine container placed at the back of the filter to keep a bit more pressure on the donut against the air box housing on the opposite end...

Heck one member used a 2x4 of wood to achieve similar results
 
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Discussion Starter #16
All I did was grease the foam donut, and made a shim out of a margarine container placed at the back of the filter to keep a bit more pressure on the donut against the air box housing on the opposite end...

Heck one member used a 2x4 of wood to achieve similar results
Without seeing why that is needed i guess a redneck fix is good enough? Do they sell something to fix it though?
 

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Without seeing why that is needed i guess a redneck fix is good enough? Do they sell something to fix it though?
Their are options but I've never looked into them.
 
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