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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy everyone,

New to the site here, and wanting to ask for opinions on 8 ply radials on 700 grizzly's.

Is anyone running them, and how much ride are they sacrificing for the extra ply's ??
Ive been running 26" Mud Lites for a few years now and I like the ride and traction they provide, but I'm getting tired of plugging holes when we ride out west in more rocky terrain. We are headed to the Big Horn WY range here in a month and then hitting the Black Hills on the way back home and I've been trying to decide on a new tire.

I really like the Sedona Mud Rebel RT's, Im thinking about 26" 10r 12's on all 4 corners. I know Big Horns are great but we see a fair amount of serious mud here in Iowa and i was hoping to find a tread that works great on both terrains...

Is anyone else running 8 ply radials or the newer Sedona RT's ??

Any thoughts or input is greatly appreciated !!

Thanks in advance everyone
 

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Welcome to GC.

I'm running the original BigHorns here in the CO mountains, but as you know, those are only 6-ply radials. There are many on here running Pitbull Growlers and those are 8-ply radials. I've never used them but may switch to them once I need new tires if they are still available. I have sliced a front BigHorn 26x9x12 and had to replace. I was running that tire at a lower psi and have since increased psi on that same size replacement and not had an issue. But that does not address your question about mud or ride quality on 8-ply.
 

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I think 8 ply is toooooo much, the sidewall is part of the suspension.
I run 11 p.s.i. around and have only two plugs from screws in 7000 miles. I crushed a wheel and broke the bead, pounded the wheel out, the bead took and the tire is still on the machine, These O.G.'s are tough and work great in thick mud with 33% bentonite, very slick and sticky.
https://flic.kr/p/fvZF8j I did farming near Pleasantville, about the same sticky as here.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think 8 ply is toooooo much, the sidewall is part of the suspension.
I run 11 p.s.i. around and have only two plugs from screws in 7000 miles. I crushed a wheel and broke the bead, pounded the wheel out, the bead took and the tire is still on the machine, These O.G.'s are tough and work great in thick mud with 33% bentonite, very slick and sticky.
https://flic.kr/p/fvZF8j I did farming near Pleasantville, about the same sticky as here.
Wow !!

I know the Big Horns have a huge fan base for good reason.

I’ll have to report my findings.
I ended up ordering 8 ply 26” Kenda Bear Claw HTR’s
The Up’s man dropped them off today. They look almost identical in size to my 26” Mud Lite’s.
Hopefully I’ll have time to get them mounted up tomorrow and take them for a spin

98330
 

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I’ll have to report my findings.
I ended up ordering 8 ply 26” Kenda Bear Claw HTR’s
The Up’s man dropped them off today. They look almost identical in size to my 26” Mud Lite’s.
Hopefully I’ll have time to get them mounted up tomorrow and take them for a spin
I think you're going to love them!

I've got 26" HTRs on my ride, and two weeks ago, on a ride, I found what I thought was a shallow mud puddle to ride through.... turned out to be a lot deeper than I thought. The machine instantly sank, listing just a little to port, and the engine died. Mud was WELL up over the footboard on the side, and over the top of the rear diff. I started it back up, put it in low, and was ready for slinging lots of mud, working it back and forth, and drama... nope, it just pulled right along and out of the mud like it was nothing.
 

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I have the HTR'S also with around 4000 miles on them, great wearing tire, no flats yet and tires are1/3 wore, they are good in most conditions great overall trail tire, they are not a deep mudding tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That’s great to hear !!
It does seem like the Bear Claws have pretty good reviews from most people.
I can’t wait to try them out myself !

if I get them mounted up today I’ll be sure to post some pic’s. And after I get a few miles on them I’ll share my thoughts about them compared to the Mud Lites.

Thanks for all the input so far !!
 

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I've been using ITP Bajacross XD 8-ply tires on the stock factory rims with good results. My first set was 25" diameter tires, got 9000+ miles before the rear tires started failing (cords inside tire separating from rubber), still plenty of tread though.

I had these tires up to 53 mph on asphalt, smooth as silk, no shake, and no wobble. Never had a flat, except I broke the outer bead on the left front (wedged sideways in a deep rutted mud hole). Most of the miles were woods, trails, some rocks.
They also held air very well (5 psi). I very rarely had to add air through out the season.

I just replaced them with another set but this time they are 26" dia.
Hopefully these will hold up well also.



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Discussion Starter #9
Well,
I got them all mounted up today and went for a few laps around the yard before heading down the blacktop road and quickly discovered these tires have a pretty serious “death wobble” from 34 mph - 48 mph.
Pretty disappointed to say the least,
I’m not sure what the return policy with Dennis Kirk is but I’ll be finding out tomorrow..
Didnt feel much like posting pics after the big let down.

I’ll post what happens from here
 

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It could be mounting/balancing - my set wobbles a tiny bit on the road, but not much... and not at all noticeable on hardpack roads.

Dennis Kirk is usually pretty good about returns, but keep us posted.
 

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I’d rule out other potential causes on the machine before I sent them back. Kenda makes good tires.

Get it on jack stands or a lift with all four tires off the ground. Grab each tire and give it a shake to rule out wheel bearings, ball joints, lug nuts, tie rods, control arm bushings etc. Even better to get someone else to do the shaking while you stick your head around the wheel to look for play. Check the air pressures in your tires. If you had them swapped at a shop the kid running the tire machine won’t usually care what they fill them to as long as they get the bead seated. On that note, check that the bead is seated all the way around, inside and out, on each tire. The rim guard should be covering the wheel lip. Make sure that your diff isn’t locked by turning a front wheel. It should turn the opposite tire the opposite direction when in 4wd. Don’t trust the switch or the indicator. Then fire it up and get everything spinning on the jack stands. Don’t stick your head around the wheel for this part. Watch for lateral and axial runout on the wheels and the tires themselves. Runout can be an installation problem (loose spacer, loose nuts) or a component problem (bent wheel, defective tire). Try this in 2wd and 4wd. If the issue still can’t be found, put it back on the ground and check your toe-in. Should be between 0.0-0.390” toe-in. If the toe in is really high the new tires might be scrubbing and wanting to bounce. Were you in 4wd or 2wd when you tried it out on the pavement?

The contact patch on your new tires is a lot different than your worn mudlites. Sometimes this brings out small problems that the old tires were hiding.
 
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Well,
I got them all mounted up today and went for a few laps around the yard before heading down the blacktop road and quickly discovered these tires have a pretty serious “death wobble” from 34 mph - 48 mph.
Pretty disappointed to say the least,
I’m not sure what the return policy with Dennis Kirk is but I’ll be finding out tomorrow..
Didnt feel much like posting pics after the big let down.

I’ll post what happens from here
What tires did you end up buying?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well,
I got them all mounted up today and went for a few laps around the yard before heading down the blacktop road
It could be mounting/balancing - my set wobbles a tiny bit on the road, but not much... and not at all noticeable on hardpack roads.

Dennis Kirk is usually pretty good about returns, but keep us posted.
[/
What tires did you end up buying?
Ended up with Kenda Bear Claw HTR’s
 

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In the past some members with simular issues managed to get their tires balance.... Worth a try.

Heck it mite only be one bad tire out of the four causing this issue
 
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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I’d rule out other potential causes on the machine before I sent them back. Kenda makes good tires.

Get it on jack stands or a lift with all four tires off the ground. Grab each tire and give it a shake to rule out wheel bearings, ball joints, lug nuts, tie rods, control arm bushings etc. Even better to get someone else to do the shaking while you stick your head around the wheel to look for play. Check the air pressures in your tires. If you had them swapped at a shop the kid running the tire machine won’t usually care what they fill them to as long as they get the bead seated. On that note, check that the bead is seated all the way around, inside and out, on each tire. The rim guard should be covering the wheel lip. Make sure that your diff isn’t locked by turning a front wheel. It should turn the opposite tire the opposite direction when in 4wd. Don’t trust the switch or the indicator. Then fire it up and get everything spinning on the jack stands. Don’t stick your head around the wheel for this part. Watch for lateral and axial runout on the wheels and the tires themselves. Runout can be an installation problem (loose spacer, loose nuts) or a component problem (bent wheel, defective tire). Try this in 2wd and 4wd. If the issue still can’t be found, put it back on the ground and check your toe-in. Should be between 0.0-0.390” toe-in. If the toe in is really high the new tires might be scrubbing and wanting to bounce. Were you in 4wd or 2wd when you tried it out on the pavement?

The contact patch on your new tires is a lot different than your worn mudlites. Sometimes this brings out small problems that the old tires were hiding.
That’s a valid point, I’ll definitely check the toe in first.
I mounted the tires myself. I have aluminum ITP wheels that I took mud lites off of and installed the new Kenda’s. It took about 30 psi in each of them to seat the beads all the way around. I’m running 5 psi (on a digital gauge) on the rear’s and 6.5 psi on the fronts.
I hate to say it but the worn mud lites were pretty dang smooth at all speeds above 3 mph....

When I did take it for a spin yesterday it was only in 2wd.
Its definitely one or both of the fronts that has the issue. It shakes the bars pretty hard from 35 - 45 mph.

I truck for a living and have probably mounted a 1,000 tires in my lifetime, Im pretty confident this is a casing that was manufactured wrong. But I’ll do some more digging into it today

Thanks a bunch everyone for all input so far !
I will definitely keep you guys posted on the findings !!
 

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The tires look nice, so for the 'Death Wobble" a few points above need to be considered closely.
Quality tire manufactures match balance tires the minimize weight required for smooth running, this goes for most types of tire applications including a.t.v.'s, this started years ago with car/truck manufactures demanding tires that fall into certain specs to minimize noise and provide best ride with new vehicles. If a tire does not fall into the spec range for probable weight required for smooth ride it is sold to discount tire retailers for used vehicles.
The manufacturer has a machine with expanding fingers that spin up a tire to find the heavy end of the tire and determine the weight required after mounting and a small dot is apply to the sidewall opposite to this heavy end.
This dot is positioned at the valve stem at mounting.....do your tires have this dot?
https://flic.kr/p/hWYXM1 I mounted my tires too, and put the dot in the right place, and also had to put a lot of air in them to set the bead....over 25#s.....and notice the dot is not by the valve stem. On the first day ride I started the p.s.i. down as suggested on the fender placard, and thee things rode like crap.
Not so much a 'Death Wobble' but the bike hunted the road back and forth, ducked and dived sideways violently and the faster she went, the worse the danger. To address this violence that day on the trail I started adding air. I added these tires and took off on a 9 days camp/fishing/riding trip, and that first morning out started as a disaster.
What turned out to be happening was these 6 ply radials, at tooooo low of tire pressure, flexed toooooo much inside the stock wheels. The tread grabbed the surfaces so well it followed every little tire track ridge or trail rut and due to the soft sidewall there was a delay until the machine caught up to the tread....the tread ducked left, a split second later the machine ducked left about the time the right ducked to the right and holy crap it was like riding a wild horse.
As for the dot not at the valve stem, I was not easy on the throttle that first day and the wheel slipped in the bead some. And around 11#s p.s.i. has been in that place since.
Different wheel widths and tire widths have more to do with the right amount of air pressure than anything I rode one day at 20 p.s.i. and didn't hurt anything, try if you have to.
In your picture I can't see the spot, so other things to check are the roundness and bearing wear.
I would get it off the ground solidly, remove the wheels/tires and wiggle on the yokes and knuckles by hand to feel for any wiggle due to a bad bearing. I have done this 'wiggle' with the wheel on the machine and felt nothing, to still have a problem so when back in the garage I removed the wheel and could feel the slightest amount of movement. Hum...it was on the front so I removed the axle nut and got the knuckle loose and when she slid off the axle, the bearing came apart with balls rolling on the floor. On the other side I detected no wobble, and that bearing came apart in my hand too. (I suggest the 2-pack kawi package with Grizzly bearing and replace both side together.)
If your bearing seem good, mount one wheel (I would do a rear on the right rear for reasons later) and slowly spin it to look for round. Can you set up a dial indicator? If it look round and feel round then fire up the machine and sin'er at speed. On the right side you can see and run the throttle easily. For roundness I would have a lot of air the tire.
After determining the status of that wheel/tire unit I would remove that wheel and use that corner for all others.
You can have out-of-round, out-of-balance, bad parts, mis-manufacture or improper air pressure. Good Luck....mine was too little air.....problem solved.
 

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Just to add a bit to what ridgeway said the rim manufacturers always put the valve stem in the lightest part of the rim so that is why one matches the dot on the tire to the valve stem. It’s a pain but I would take them to a auto shop and have them check the balance.
 
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