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I'm looking to replace my Brute Force. I ride in the Florida swamps so it's at least rack deep water and thick mud. Everybody else here either has Polaris or Can-Am. I want something different. I don't know anything about the Grizzlys. I know they are making one that is gear towards mud. I have a few questions. How is the aftermarket products? I'll have to run at least 30" tires. Is the clutch capable for tires that heavy? Any info is appreciated.
 

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The Grizzly doesn't seem to be really made for mud riding compared to the other offerings out there. It is down on HP compared to the 700+ class and some believe the Polaris 570 pulls better. There is currently no Grizzly that has decent snorkels, relocated front rack radiator and the largest tires are 27" OEM (IIRC). The Grizzly platform is a good platform but I personally see it more as a trail bike than a swamper/mudder. However, there are many who have converted their Grizzly to be a mudding/swamping machine and seem happy.

There is a decent aftermarket for the Grizzly. CVT mods are relatively easy. But compare the aftermarket you get with Polaris and probably Can-Am, it might seem a lot less for Yamaha. Then there is the HP thing where you will be down. I really do like the reliability of my Grizzly and feel it is very fun to throw around on the trails I ride but not certain it would be the best choice for a mudding machine.
 

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Welcome from Colorado.
X-2 on above. You will need c.v.t. mods, heavier axles, a radiator re-locate, a high flow snorkel re-locate set-up, a suspension lift and probably E.H.S computer help to go deep then the bigger engine will let you know you need more power.
The reliability of the grizz will be good in the long run if you can stand the lower power out-put.
 

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IMO the Grizz is not the best choice for a pure mud machine but is the best for reliability. I guess you can't be the best at everything..... that being said you can make a good mud machine out of them and have good reliability. My buddy's 09 700 with a big lift , snorkels , radiator relocate , 30" Outlaws and clutch work rides with us trail riders all day and goes through plenty we can't but it's not comfortable at all. We switch machines sometimes to play around and he calls mine a Cadillac..... wait till I install the Elkas!!
 

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DON'T. DO. IT.

I bought a 2014 700 brand new. I made an informed decision. I bought it for fast woods riding, hunting duties, and general utility at that time. It serves great for those.

Recently single, I've started going to mud parks just to do something different. I've started building the griz up, and it's much more difficult than a popo or a Can-Am, to end up with similar performance, for a similar price.

To put it in perspective, I am almost always the only Yamaha in the parks. This means for things like expensive lifts (CATVOS, SLC, etc.), you are almost always going to have to pay full price, because finding these parts used is nearly impossible, because they're just not popular for the Grizz.

Also, my local trade groups on Facebook are always running over with tire and wheel sets to fit Can-Am and Polaris. I wish I could trade like these guys constantly do, to dial in what I like, without always buying new.

The looks that I get in these parks on the Grizz is hilarious actually. I might as well be riding a purple donkey.

I also have a heavy background in offroading trucks. When I made my purchase, I favored the Yamaha four-wheel drive and diff lock system to the automatic systems in the dominant mud brands. I'll admit that with my current use, it's starting to get really old. When I might go months between needing the locker, it was great. Now, I might need it off and on 10 times in a half hour. Waiting on it to lock really sucks. It is definitely a blast from the past at this point. Also, I notice that Can-Am and Polaris have made major improvements in engagement time.

Given your intended use, I'd walk straight past Yamaha. They obviously don't want your business.

I don't mean to bash Yamaha. I am a Honda guy at heart, but what Honda offered in 2014 just didn't meet my requirements (bigger bore, IRS, diff lock). For a reliable and nimble machine, the Yamaha has definitely filled my needs well for the past few years. Now, not so much.

Now that my intended use has changed, I look back on my decision not to buy the outlander 1000 when I made my purchase. I don't fret though. Had I bought the Outlander back in 2014 I question whether it would still be running today.

And, oh yeah, I want portals so bad right now. They don't exist and likely never will.
 

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Cass at Mainville ATV and Outdoors rips her heavily modded Kodiak 700 around and hangs with all the can ams, Po Pos, and sxs in the mud.

https://youtu.be/irhBISi7w14

https://youtu.be/lJUpTeAjpGU
Exactly, I was going to mention Cassandra's Kodiak. Momma bear will do damn near anything that 1000 xmr will do and she's only been into mudding and quads for about a year, she's a dirt bike chick originally.

The grizzly has a pretty good aftermarket. The reason it seems the can ams and Polaris have more is because they break more.
You beef up the grizz or kodi and that's it, your not breaking shit every run.

Myself, I'm not into mud, to me that's pointless, I'm out to enjoy nature, my goal is not to get a 600lb+ machine stuck and have to sweat my balls off, wheeling to get it out.. I just don't see the fun in that. But others are into it and I have a theory on that....

I still think the reliability of the yamaha trumps the power of the big bikes. If I can spend less money and still do 90% of what the big bird can do, and not break stuff, or break less than them... It's a no brainer.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

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Cass at Mainville ATV and Outdoors rips her heavily modded Kodiak 700 around and hangs with all the can ams, Po Pos, and sxs in the mud.

https://youtu.be/irhBISi7w14

https://youtu.be/lJUpTeAjpGU
Exactly, I was going to mention Cassandra's Kodiak. Momma bear will do damn near anything that 1000 xmr will do and she's only been into mudding and quads for about a year, she's a dirt bike chick originally.

The grizzly has a pretty good aftermarket. The reason it seems the can ams and Polaris have more is because they break more.
You beef up the grizz or kodi and that's it, your not breaking shit every run.

Myself, I'm not into mud, to me that's pointless, I'm out to enjoy nature, my goal is not to get a 600lb+ machine stuck and have to sweat my balls off, wheeling to get it out.. I just don't see the fun in that. But others are into it and I have a theory on that....

I still think the reliability of the yamaha trumps the power of the big bikes. If I can spend less money and still do 90% of what the big bird can do, and not break stuff, or break less than them... It's a no brainer.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
While I don't disagree with your implication that Polaris and Can Am break more, I strongly disagree with the assumption that this is the entire reason why the aftermarket is larger for them. You don't find many offerings for outriggers or wakeboard towers for bass boats either, regardless of thier reliability.

It's about being the proper tool for the job. I skimmed through the videos above. I didn't see that Kodiak in anything that I wouldn't have walked my stock Grizz (or Hondas) through, other than one obviously deep hole, which the Kodiak didn't attempt.

That Kodiak sure wouldn't follow a stock XMR Can Am or Highlifter Polaris in this part of the country, nor would it follow Ostacruiser anywhere, up your way.

I wouldn't want to be the ass that had to slow my riding buddies down all day because I brought the wrong tool, but I consider myself to be a considerate person. I particularly try to ride with the Honda crowd to avoid being that guy. To each his own.

Perhaps I need to watch more of thier stuff, but this couple looks like Cubbeezx, ten years after the fact, which isn't very awe inspiring. Much like Cub back then, it looks like a Vlog of beginner ATV enthusiasts.

Given where the most riding opportunities lie for OP and myself, the Grizz just isnt the right tool for the job. I do get a bit of a giggle from the funny looks I get in the swamp with the Grizz, but, in reality, I'm only doing it because my Grizz is in good shape and paid for.

I'll go no further than snorkels, exhaust, CDI, tires, and minor clutch mods on my Grizz. If I do, the ROI in performance is just not there, and I lose what the Grizz is good for to begin with, which is reliability.

At that point, if I were to continue to chase the carrot, I might as well be on a Popo or Can Am. I definitely wouldn't be anywhere near the performance of an XMR or Highlifter bike, and the margin of reliability between them all would be minimal if I continued to mod.

I sense a lack of awareness based on your unstated "theories" on motivation. I see this often in this forum in general. There are some posters with great technical knowledge of this platform here, but the forum tends to skew towards a certain type of riding, one that is consistent with the type of videos posted above. That makes sense, given the strengths of the platform though. I do see replies telling posters the downsides of certain mods, but all too often I don't see the more correct answer, which is "buy a different bike", given that many of these posters riding opportunities and/or locales aren't going to change.

The Southern U.S., counterintuitively, isn't as rural as one might assume. As opposed to the Western U.S. and much of B.C. and Ont. (I've wheeled a bit in all the above, particularly in trucks/jeeps), it's actually kind of hard to find much public unpaved territory in the South to conquer. There aren't any "Alpine Loops" down here, for sure.

Public riding areas are few and far between down here. The vast majority of our land is privately owned. This means that below Tennessee, most of our riding opportunities are either on agricultural hunting leases (swamp) or ATV parks (swamp). OP's locale does have more public opportunities than my area, but, they are almost all SWAMP.

Bottom line, it is very irresponsible to recommend what is clearly the wrong tool for the job based on blind brand loyalty. I've been riding for 36+ years. I knew what I was buying, and it fit that use case at the time, and then some. This guy is here asking, because I assume that he hasn't owned a Grizz and thus, doesn't know for sure. We have, and we should know better, unless we are ignorant to the area and opportunities available in which OP rides.

How many progressions of bike builds shown here over the years, including big lifts, bbks, etc. does it take to figure out that it's the wrong tool for this particular use case? To my knowledge almost all of these full-tilt builds were either sold or scrapped, once the builder realized what the limits and the drawbacks (reliability) of the builds were.

The Grizzly is a great "all around" bike, for "all around" terrain. If I understand OP correctly, that's not his use case.
 

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While I don't disagree with your implication that Polaris and Can Am break more, I strongly disagree with the assumption that this is the entire reason why the aftermarket is larger for them. You don't find many offerings for outriggers or wakeboard towers for bass boats either, regardless of thier reliability.

It's about being the proper tool for the job. I skimmed through the videos above. I didn't see that Kodiak in anything that I wouldn't have walked my stock Grizz (or Hondas) through, other than one obviously deep hole, which the Kodiak didn't attempt.

That Kodiak sure wouldn't follow a stock XMR Can Am or Highlifter Polaris in this part of the country, nor would it follow Ostacruiser anywhere, up your way.

I wouldn't want to be the ass that had to slow my riding buddies down all day because I brought the wrong tool, but I consider myself to be a considerate person. I particularly try to ride with the Honda crowd to avoid being that guy. To each his own.

Perhaps I need to watch more of thier stuff, but this couple looks like Cubbeezx, ten years after the fact, which isn't very awe inspiring. Much like Cub back then, it looks like a Vlog of beginner ATV enthusiasts.

Given where the most riding opportunities lie for OP and myself, the Grizz just isnt the right tool for the job. I do get a bit of a giggle from the funny looks I get in the swamp with the Grizz, but, in reality, I'm only doing it because my Grizz is in good shape and paid for.

I'll go no further than snorkels, exhaust, CDI, tires, and minor clutch mods on my Grizz. If I do, the ROI in performance is just not there, and I lose what the Grizz is good for to begin with, which is reliability.

At that point, if I were to continue to chase the carrot, I might as well be on a Popo or Can Am. I definitely wouldn't be anywhere near the performance of an XMR or Highlifter bike, and the margin of reliability between them all would be minimal if I continued to mod.

I sense a lack of awareness based on your unstated "theories" on motivation. I see this often in this forum in general. There are some posters with great technical knowledge of this platform here, but the forum tends to skew towards a certain type of riding, one that is consistent with the type of videos posted above. That makes sense, given the strengths of the platform though. I do see replies telling posters the downsides of certain mods, but all too often I don't see the more correct answer, which is "buy a different bike", given that many of these posters riding opportunities and/or locales aren't going to change.

The Southern U.S., counterintuitively, isn't as rural as one might assume. As opposed to the Western U.S. and much of B.C. and Ont. (I've wheeled a bit in all the above, particularly in trucks/jeeps), it's actually kind of hard to find much public unpaved territory in the South to conquer. There aren't any "Alpine Loops" down here, for sure.

Public riding areas are few and far between down here. The vast majority of our land is privately owned. This means that below Tennessee, most of our riding opportunities are either on agricultural hunting leases (swamp) or ATV parks (swamp). OP's locale does have more public opportunities than my area, but, they are almost all SWAMP.

Bottom line, it is very irresponsible to recommend what is clearly the wrong tool for the job based on blind brand loyalty. I've been riding for 36+ years. I knew what I was buying, and it fit that use case at the time, and then some. This guy is here asking, because I assume that he hasn't owned a Grizz and thus, doesn't know for sure. We have, and we should know better, unless we are ignorant to the area and opportunities available in which OP rides.

How many progressions of bike builds shown here over the years, including big lifts, bbks, etc. does it take to figure out that it's the wrong tool for this particular use case? To my knowledge almost all of these full-tilt builds were either sold or scrapped, once the builder realized what the limits and the drawbacks (reliability) of the builds were.

The Grizzly is a great "all around" bike, for "all around" terrain. If I understand OP correctly, that's not his use case.
first...you assume my brand loyalty ...wrong, i will ride whatever suits me, except polaris atv, they should stick to sxs and sleds...they own that. i grew up on hondas, the japanese big 4 make the best built machines. if I were to jump to an 850+ bike, it would be can am.

ostacrusier shouldn't even be mentioned...he's in a class of his own, way above anything mentioned here.

comparing mainville atv videos to cubbiezx is a major kick in the nuts to them. you definitely need to watch more than the mild vids posted above. Cubbee looks to be an overly cautious, almost inexperienced rider wen he comes to an obstacle or is trying to guide CK over something.
Atleast Kyal and Cass attempt difficult terrain, and don't make a history channel dramatic scean from a small ditch or a brook. Watching cubbee's vids are actually what steered me towards my Yamaha purchase. i do basic trails 75% of the timebut wanted smething that will get me through just about anything in that other 25%.
i can guarantee that kodiak will go where your stock grizz or honda will never make it. i have the same exact kodiak in stock form other than tires, and I know I couldn't follow her bike.

I'm not recommending the wrong tool for the job, it's a tool that is fully capable.
 

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I had a Grizzly on 31" Outlaws that had just an HL Extreme full clutch kit, CDI, Rix Risers, Bars, TigerTail, HL 2" Lift, HL shock springs, EHS fuel controller, 2R Racing front and rear 2" recievers with a quick relocate winch setup, and a stereo. It did great on the trails, in the mud, and in the water bogs. The only time I ever felt the lack of power needed was bogging out of a hole. I felt some roots there and that soft spongy power delivery as I was easy on the throttle surely kept me from snapping an axle. Many people snap axles climbing out of holes at throttle when the lug on their aggressive tire catches a root or rock.

Now I've had an XMR1000R also. That thing was a beast no doubt. It was the engine that made that thing the beast it was IMO. The longer chassis does help in the deeper stuff too. It was pretty good on the trails too. I didn't care for the Visco-Lok on some of the more technical stuff though. I also didn't care for not having a separate front brake. It was a fun machine. My buddy had a 15 XMR1000 also. He had just over a year into his and it developed some oil leaks. The dealer would not warranty it and he was left with the bill. Knowing how well he maintained and babied that thing...and hearing other horror storys on the Can-Am forums...I sold mine.

Do I miss that XMR1000R? Yeah. I miss the engine. However, I miss that Grizzly too.

I'd hold out to see if we hear anything from Yamaha about a possible 850 this year.

The only reasons Can-Am and Polaris have grown to what they are is they're not afraid to put bigger engines with more power to the ground, and they created condition specific models instead of more "all arounders" like the Japanese do.
 
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