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I keep seeing set ups like this and have to say, it seems like a pretty great idea.

Everyone thats done it says its the hot ticket....now if I could just figure out where to find old conveyor belt material to make some of my own?
They really do work great. Getting complaints from my Queen that her new machine doesn't have them yet.
I bought it new at a what used to be a "farm" store now kind of a department store Blain's Farm & Fleet. Any farm/implement store should have belting.
 
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I'm also considering selling the Raptor, very torn about that, but I can probably sell it for what I paid for it or more and use that money to pay off a small loan I have. Decisions, decisions! :confused:
I knew Wiley 30 years ago :)
Don't sell the raptor until you bring up here for a spin, I want to watch how it does in the rocks and rivers around here.
As we've high-jacked this thread;
2 wheel drive is good for most situations.
Due to my tire wear with 10% tread on the rears and 90% on the fronts I'm in 2 wheel most of the time, and with more ground clearance than the raptor I go over bigger rocks and through deeper ruts.
The reason a Grizzly is better here is the platform design.
I have a winch for the few days a year I ride in tough areas and bad conditions.
Also the platform allows me to pile stuff on racks in places the raptor doesn't have places.
Each model has different features, and the average riders is happy with the stock set-up for the intended conditions THEN some learn the stock machine is be better with modifications.
Here are three Grizzlies loaded for a 3 day trip into the desert of west Colorado.
We started from Ridgway an hour before sun-up to use the highway when the state patrol was at the donut shop, and we got 20 miles from town around sunrise.
https://flic.kr/p/fSQtrr this is the machines 10 miles further along the trail.
https://flic.kr/p/fSQsqP
 

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I keep seeing set ups like this and have to say, it seems like a pretty great idea.

Everyone thats done it says its the hot ticket....now if I could just figure out where to find old conveyor belt material to make some of my own?
I would go take a look at the heavy duty rubber mud flaps for trucks, might be the ticket. If not that, how about the tailgate mat. Gator Rubber Tailgate Mat | Gator Covers
 

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OP, sorry we took over your thread. Hopefully you got some good info on the tire situation before our highjacking😁

Ridgeway, you guys must have a group photographer along on your rides😄 I’m working on equipping my Grizz for long distance trips in the remote areas of northern Idaho and Montana. I’m still working on my “packing list” so I’ve gotta ask. What’s the full size shovel for? And how does you grizz do when loaded down like that? The rear racks on these bikes seem like they should have been made a bit stronger, but looks like yours is taking the weight.
 

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They really do work great. Getting complaints from my Queen that her new machine doesn't have them yet.
I bought it new at a what used to be a "farm" store now kind of a department store Blain's Farm & Fleet. Any farm/implement store should have belting.
I see that Amazon has 4"x 60" belting for 20 bucks.
 

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Ridgeway, you guys must have a group photographer along on your rides😄 I’m working on equipping my Grizz for long distance trips in the remote areas of northern Idaho and Montana. I’m still working on my “packing list” so I’ve gotta ask. What’s the full size shovel for? And how does you grizz do when loaded down like that? The rear racks on these bikes seem like they should have been made a bit stronger, but looks like yours is taking the weight.
:)
I took most of the photos seen, if I'm in a photos the short guy took it or the other tall guy used my camera.
https://flic.kr/p/fxbTvs I also use a tripod and delay timer some, the tripod is rolled in the towel.
https://flic.kr/p/fxcaqq
The shovel is for 'just in case', say at night to make a fire pit or move rocks or logs. On that trip we planned to be out 3 days on a big looping ride (no back tracking) and every now and then on a loop we come upon something washed out or needing filled to get past. The shovel can be handy for filling the bottom of a washout to cross, or in camp at night.

When loaded the Griz wallows around like a fat Canned Ham. Loaded heavy its not nibble but that's not what the ride is about. On that trip (you'll need a map) I started from Ridgway heading west to meet up with the others 5 miles out of town before heading west to the south end of the Uncompahgre Plateau. We turned up the mountain headed northwest towards Grand Junction riding 136 miles the first day along the east side of the plateau. We camped the first night in the desert of Escalante Canyon, then headed to the Uranium fields the next day above Nucla, Colorado on the west side of the plateau by going around the north end of the plateau....the plateau is 92 miles long across the top.

The Griz was loaded for three days of travel without going to town or a pre-staged fuel dump. You can see the 5 gallons on the rear seat, there is a 2.5 gallon can inside each side of the rear seat box. The soft coolers hold meat and the front rack carried camp stuff. It was heavy but we were traveling a slower constant pace being careful and the Griz did just fine.

In this picture west of Delta along the river you can see the results of a flash flood.
https://flic.kr/p/fSRauN See the debris washed against the tree? Yes at 6000ft. you can still have trouble with flooding on the way to the desert.

The racks are stronger than most imagine, I think many guess at facts without testing. All told there wasn't 100 pounds total on the rack as some of the weight was on the rear seat.

Most members don't go out for days needing everything carried on their griz for the time gone. Most members showing heavy weight generally are out for a day carrying chains saws or other tools.

In days past we had members posting pictures of elk loaded on their Grizzly, then the Griz was driven loaded up ramps into the back of a truck. These things are tough, the trick is to know what you need to carry then plan on how to load it, and don't consider pretty when loading :)

I found this old picture from YEPSED, from the 'Good Old Days'
Tire Wheel Car Land vehicle Vehicle
 

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Ridgeway, sounds like you guys have made some epic ATV trips. I bought the Grizz for exactly that kind of use. I’m planning for 6 gallons of gas, 2-3 gallons of water, food, camping gear, tools, etc. I think I will have about 100lbs on the rear rack as well along with another 80lbs or so on the front rack. If it can handle an elk, I guess I’ll be just fine! Debating weather my tripod and “real” camera will come along.
 

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Ridgeway, sounds like you guys have made some epic ATV trips. I bought the Grizz for exactly that kind of use. I’m planning for 6 gallons of gas, 2-3 gallons of water, food, camping gear, tools, etc. I think I will have about 100lbs on the rear rack as well along with another 80lbs or so on the front rack. If it can handle an elk, I guess I’ll be just fine! Debating weather my tripod and “real” camera will come along.
Saying our trip(s) are epic causes me to laugh, this is a big country that lets you be 'As Big' as you have balls to be, and for most 'Big' equates to danger made-up in their head; here's more detail about what happened on day one of the 236 mile trip above, the head game of danger and screaming and shitting your pants when danger was no where around.

Planning for the trip leaving on a Friday started the previous Monday after Hearing on the radio news a railroad bridge was being repaired/updated so the tracks through Delta, Colorado would be closed for the day. Again you'll need a map to understand the area of perceived danger.

The news report was important as the tracks bring Coal from the high mines above Paonia, Colorado east of Delta then go west high above the River, through the high desert through the Escalante canyon area. Look at the map to know the only way through this area other than the State highway or floating the river is through the desert riding the rails heading to Grand Junction. On google maps scroll in using the satellite view to see the cliffs the track follow high above the water. I had always wanted to do the loop around the plateau but there are many trains a day using the rails so the chances of hitting a gap between trails while in the narrows made a trip like this unthinkable even to me until!
I heard the radio so looked in the paper and the tracks were going to be closed the next Friday, so I started planning a trip that so far has been a once and done use of the rails by an a.t.v. (I know there are rules against this, but I like to live and make stories so). The news was learned on Tuesday and the next day I was over at Mike's (the short guy before pictures) and the tall guy was there. They had something they wanted to do the next weekend and wanted me there so I told them I was going to busy, which then required me to tell them I going riding, but I didn't tell them about the route using the rails :) I know, I could have told them but decided to let them learn on their own......

The day started with the sunrise pictures, then we saw the elk pictures at 11,000ft.,
https://flic.kr/p/fSRsSn then we started into the desert area to watch antelope bucks in rut:
https://flic.kr/p/fSSnqW before descending a rock face to a pasture cut by the rails entering the river canyon.
https://flic.kr/p/fSQag8
What happened next happens only once or twice in your life if you're lucky, you get to see shear terror on your buddies faces when there is nothing dangerous in sight! We got across the pasture below the elevated track bed entering the canyon cut and the tall guy started to swallow hard looking back at me knowing the short guy would ask where next. (Another part of the story is the short guy's wife was going to meet us in the Escalante with their pop-up camper and her a.t.v. trailered before we left his house. She had a job so left home after work, by the highway she only did 60 miles.)
With her planning to meet us in a designated area, without cell service I told him we had to go that way because there was no time to back track to a highway and meet her as agreed, and she would be pissed if we didn't show up, she's a mean'ol woman and was the scariest part of the 3 day trip :)

After we had a refreshing beverage at the bottom of the incline I rode up showing them it could be done, then used the winch to pull the other two up. It turned out these were welded rails much taller than the rails I remembered when A KID. The rails barely fit under the stock 550s Stretch and Shorty were riding, and it turned out the rails weren't more than a few inches wider than the Grizzlies. I could easily straddle the rails while those two had to run between the rails going slower, all the time with the thought of a train barreling up from behind, or steaming in from around the bend just ahead.

I took off with stretch close behind, with Shorty screaming wanting to go back, but not wanting to be the group pussy. I never knew if he was scared of dying by train or going home to his wife left in the desert, but I do remember laughing knowing there was no train coming through that day. As bad as life was for Shorty, Stretch was just as scared. They seemed to have something to live for, something not yet done by the look on their face, but they wasn't going to be the group pussy.

I don't remember the distance we traveled by rail but it was long enough. We had gone maybe a mile when I saw signaling hardware bolted to the ties between the rails with a signal pole next to the tracks. The next problem was the hardware didn't look very strong for an a.t.v. to drive over, and I damn sure didn't want an alarm to go off in an office somewhere with a phone call to the sheriff. I stopped, looked and determined we had to ride back over the rail to go to the bottom of the bed next to the cliff the bed was cut into, to get around the signal switch and pole to then go back up to the rails to continue. Stretch was sitting there waiting for Shorty to arrive when I got on my 660 to go around the signal switch, and it was at that time
Shorty saw his next problem. He looked down to his right into the bottom I used, a 45 degree angle bed ending at a vertical wall of the cliff rising above our heads, or to his right down a 45 degree angle to the river water flowing below, a hill side covered in brush that might have stopped a machine from falling. He didn't like his choices, and when he stopped screaming (I had only moved 40ft. down the tracks so heard him well) I said he could turn around and go back, which again reminded him of his wife, so he followed me and Stretch around the signal switch and signal light pole:)

At that obstacle Stretch took the lead, passing me at the bottom of the bed. He got to the rail and decided his best chance for survival was to ride straddling the rail as fast as he could to get the 'f' out of there, and he did it leaving me and Shorty behind, it was during this time snot blew from my nose with tears blocking my view. It took me a few minutes to winch Shorty up to the rail and the entire time I could hear Stretch's 550 scream next to the cliff toward a right hander bending steel out of sight. As I got back on my 660 I looked up to see the 550 tail light on. Stretch considered for a short time a train around the bend, then he said 'f' it as he wasn't going back cause there could be a train coming up behind us. I'll tell you about what I told Stretch of this 'running off' in a minute, as I wasn't mad knowing we were safe, but I did give him more to dream about.

Anyway, we rode a few miles further until out of the canyon and into rolling desert sagebrush, there was no trail proving nobody else had pulled off that run. We got to camp just as the wife was pulling in, and in camp later I told Stretch it was Ok that he rode off to leave us, as he was far down the rails that if there was a train hit him Shorty and I would have heard the whistle giving us more time to get off the tracks. I thanked him for his selflessness and riding point.

To end this story, Shorty died a year later: his handle here was chuckhole and he still trusted me, I guess he like riding more than he wanted to be with the wife.
Stretch was a good friend until cancer took him last year. I did tell him a few years ago of the bridge repair, and I waited until I 'knew' he didn't have a pistol on him!

Epic rides, not so much.
All that's needed is desire to go somewhere, the time to make the plan and a Grizz to make the trip without failing you. Oh, I didn't take self incriminating photos in the canyon. Use the map if you want a good laugh.
 

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I plan on acquiring a 2023 Grizzly SE. It comes with the Maxxis Zilla, which is not an ideal tire for us since we don't do any mudding. We use our ATVs for mostly casual trail riding in the woods and fields upstate NY. We also use them small back roads that are hard pack dirt. The days or riding "hard" are behind us. Yes the EPS model would make more sense but i cant get passed the colors for 2022 and 2023 so that's why i am considering the SE. I have heard mixed reviews on the Zillas as far as an all terrain tire and don't have any first hand experience. I have 2 options: 1- try out the Zillas for a while and see how it goes maybe they are fine and i can live with them. If not then i can explore replacing. 2- replace them at the get-go and sell the Zillas (or maybe the dealer will give me a credit) . If I went down this road, and wanted to use the existing OEM 14 inch rims what are my best value tire options? I have seen alot of recommendations for ITP Terracross, ITP Blackwater EVO, pit bull growlers and Kenda bearclaws HTR. Thoughts? Also, since all the OEM rims are the same does that mean i need to keep all 4 tires the same width or can i consider staggering with smaller tire upfront? If i need to keep the same then I think i would rather go with a 9 inch or 9.5 inch wide tire instead of 10 all around. Thanks in advance for your help.
My advice would be ditch the Zillas for a traditional staggered set up. The wheels look great so if you don't mind that they are 14" I'd keep them. I know a lot of guys on here like the Bearclaw HTRs but we didn't. They shake terrible above 30mph and IMO they're too heavy for the Grizz.. You'd notice some power loss. ITP Terracross are a great non-directional tread that are 6PR so they keep the weight down a bit. I'm also not a fan of huge tires. We put Tusk Terraforms on our SE that were 25", they were perfect. Better handling, you feel the power and acceleration better with lighter tires, just improved all the characteristics of the Grizz when we replaced the Zillas. The only problem with those is that they only come in 12" size. I'd look for a 26" tire with 6PR rating at or smaller than 26x9x14 front an 26x11x14 rear if you want to get the best performance out of the Grizz. That's just one man's opinion though. I prioritize performance over ground clearance and the look of big tire. Different strokes for different folks.
 

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Saying our trip(s) are epic causes me to laugh, this is a big country and let's be 'As Big' as you have balls to be and for most 'Big' equates to danger made-up in their head; here's more detail about what happened on day one of the 236 mile trip above, the head game of danger and screaming and shitting your pants when danger was no where around.

Planning for the trip leaving on a Friday started the previous Monday after Hearing on the radio news a railroad bridge was being repaired/updated so the tracks through Delta, Colorado would be closed for the day. Again you'll need a map to understand the area of perceived danger.

The news report was important as the tracks bring Coal from the high mines above Paonia, Colorado east of Delta then go west high above the River, through the high desert through the Escalante canyon area. Look at the map to know the only way through this area other than the State highway or floating the river is through the desert riding the rails heading to Grand Junction. On google maps scroll in using the satellite view to see the cliffs the track follow high above the water. I had always wanted to do the loop around the plateau but there are many trains a day using the rails so the chances of hitting a gap between trails while in the narrows made a trip like this unthinkable even to me until!
I heard the radio so looked in the paper and the tracks were going to be closed the next Friday, so I started planning a trip that so far has been a once and done use of the rails by an a.t.v. (I know there are rules against this, but I like to live and make stories so). The news was learned on Tuesday and the next day I was over at Mike's (the short guy before pictures) and the tall guy was there. They had something they wanted to do the next weekend and wanted me there so I told them I was going to busy, which then required me to tell them I going riding, but I didn't tell them about the route using the rails :) I know, I could have told them but decided to let them learn on their own......

The day started with the sunrise pictures, then we saw the elk pictures at 11,000ft.,
https://flic.kr/p/fSRsSn then we started into the desert area to watch antelope bucks in rut:
https://flic.kr/p/fSSnqW before descending a rock face to a pasture cut by the rails entering the river canyon.
https://flic.kr/p/fSQag8
What happened next happens only once or twice in your life if you're lucky, you get to see shear terror on your buddies faces when there is nothing dangerous in sight! We got across the pasture below the elevated track bed entering the canyon cut and the tall guy started to swallow hard looking back at me knowing the short guy would ask where next. (Another part of the story is the short guy's wife was going to meet us in the Escalante with their pop-up camper and her a.t.v. trailered before we left his house. She had a job so left home after work, by the highway she only did 60 miles.)
With her planning to meet us in a designated area, without cell service I told him we had to go that way because there was no time to back track to a highway and meet her as agreed, and she would be pissed if we didn't show up, she's a mean'ol woman and was the scariest part of the 3 day trip :)

After we had a refreshing beverage at the bottom of the incline I rode up showing them it could be done, then used the winch to pull the other two up. It turned out these were welded rails much taller than the rails I remembered when A KID. The rails barely fit under the stock 550s Stretch and Shorty were riding, and it turned out the rails weren't more than a few inches wider than the Grizzlies. I could easily straddle the rails while those two had to run between the rails going slower, all the time with the thought of a train barreling up from behind, or steaming in from around the bend just ahead.

I took off with stretch close behind, with Shorty screaming wanting to go back, but not wanting to be the group pussy. I never knew if he was scared of dying by train or going home to his wife left in the desert, but I do remember laughing knowing there was no train coming through that day. As bad as life was for Shorty, Stretch was just as scared. They seemed to have something to live for, something not yet done by the look on their face, but they wasn't going to be the group pussy.

I don't remember the distance we traveled by rail but it was long enough. We had gone maybe a mile when I saw signaling hardware bolted to the ties between the rails with a signal pole next to the tracks. The next problem was the hardware didn't look very strong for an a.t.v. to drive over, and I damn sure didn't want an alarm to go off in an office somewhere with a phone call to the sheriff. I stopped, looked and determined we had to ride back over the rail to go to the bottom of the bed next to the cliff the bed was cut into, to get around the signal switch and pole to then go back up to the rails to continue. Stretch was sitting there waiting for Shorty to arrive when I got on my 660 to go around the signal switch, and it was at that time
Shorty saw his next problem. He looked down to his right into the bottom I used, a 45 degree angle bed ending at a vertical wall of the cliff rising above our heads, or to his right down a 45 degree angle to the river water flowing below, a hill side covered in brush that might have stopped a machine from falling. He didn't like his choices, and when he stopped screaming (I had only moved 40ft. down the tracks so heard him well) I said he could turn around and go back, which again reminded him of his wife, so he followed me and Stretch around the signal switch and signal light pole:)

At that obstacle Stretch took the lead, passing me at the bottom of the bed. He got to the rail and decided his best chance for survival was to ride straddling the rail as fast as he could to get the 'f' out of there, and he did it leaving me and Shorty behind, it was during this time snot blew from my nose with tears blocking my view. It took me a few minutes to winch Shorty up to the rail and the entire time I could hear Stretch's 550 scream next to the cliff toward a right hander bending steel out of sight. As I got back on my 660 I looked up to see the 550 tail light on. Stretch considered for a short time a train around the bend, then he said 'f' it as he wasn't going back cause there could be a train coming up behind us. I'll tell you about what I told Stretch of this 'running off' in a minute, as I wasn't mad knowing we were safe, but I did give him more to dream about.

Anyway, we rode a few miles further until out of the canyon and into rolling desert sagebrush, there was no trail proving nobody else had pulled off that run. We got to camp just as the wife was pulling in, and in camp later I told Stretch it was Ok that he rode off to leave us, as he was far down the rails that if there was a train hit him Shorty and I would have heard the whistle giving us more time to get off the tracks. I thanked him for his selflessness and riding point.

To end this story, Shorty died a year later: his handle here was chuckhole and he still trusted me, I guess he like riding more than he wanted to be with the wife.
Stretch was a good friend until cancer took him last year. I did tell him a few years ago of the bridge repair, and I waited until I 'knew' he didn't have a pistol on him!

Epic rides, not so much.
All that's needed is desire to go somewhere, the time to make the plan and a Grizz to make the trip without failing you. Oh, I didn't take self incriminating photos in the canyon. Use the map if you want a good laugh.

I gotta tell ya, I've been a member on this site since '08 and this has to be about one of the best stories I've seen!!! Thanks for sharing Ridgeway and for the laughs!! This is something I'd do to my buddies, especially not telling then the tracks were actually closed until after the ride.
 
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........................

Epic rides, not so much.
All that's needed is desire to go somewhere, the time to make the plan and a Grizz to make the trip without failing you. ...................
Great story Jim!
Your line in the above quote! Is an "Epic Statement" that I kinda ride/live by.
 
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I gotta tell ya, I've been a member on this site since '08 and this has to be about one of the best stories I've seen!!! Thanks for sharing Ridgeway and for the laughs!! This is something I'd do to my buddies, especially not telling then the tracks were actually closed until after the ride.
Thanks, glad you liked the ride report :)
The ride happened a few years ago, and I didn't take pictures in that section. I didn't want to be 'that guy' with self incriminating pictures of the area as I wasn't exactly sure where the crew was working, and with pictures on the camera I didn't want to encounter someone while in the canyon....what if a worker was hurt and medics were called and the sheriff was there too?
Anyway, as you liked the report I decided to look on google maps at the satellite view linked below. we rode from just west of the green fields on the west side of Delta near the 'E' in Escalante State Wildlife Area around to the west then north, to camp above the river just west of the 'S' turn in the highway, east of the Escalante Canyon Wilderness.
I did a measurement which doesn't copy/paste to here, it showed a 8.9 mile straight line across the desert; following the river Shorty and Stretch had all they wanted.
In the recent satellite photo I noticed the bridge is gone and replaced by a giant culvert, but also noticed landslides covering the tracks, dirt and rock from the cliff when the track bed was cut into the river bank.
When I told the guys of my planned trip and they said 'I want to go' I didn't envision them 'not thinking' about the required route. Everyone around here knows most of those listed roads in the desert are private ranch roads with locked gates for no public access. It didn't dawn on me until we got west of Delta that the guys were blindly following never thinking of the tracks as our path.
In the picture of us stopped in the flood wash area I first got a clue of their ignorance, so was laughing inside while hoping the schedule had not been changed without notice.
Maybe you can realize the route from online, then put your self in Shorty and Stretch's place. In that last picture taken of us stopped they look cool and unconcerned, their life changed 30 minutes after that picture!
 
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