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I've run the Anti-Gravity motorsports batteries in my racing motorcycles for many years and they've never failed me. I only needed the 4-cell for one bike, and it's the size and weight of a cell phone. My latest bike uses the 8-cell which is basically two cell phones.
I see that Anti-Gravity lists their 12-cell, 16-cell, and 20-cell batteries as ATV batteries and their parts finder lists the Grizzly 700 for these as well. https://shop.antigravitybatteries.com/productline/starter-batteries/
Anybody have Anti-Gravity or other brand of lightweight battery in their Grizzly? Would I still be able to run accessories such as a winch and hand warmers?
 

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These batteries are quite pricey. What is the main reason you would buy one for your ATV?
 

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I have the Anti-Gravity YTX12-16, bought from Amazon. I don't run a lot of stuff, but it works fine with my winch and extra lights.

I went lithium because my Grizzly frequently sits unused for a month or two at a time, and I was tired of the battery always being dead. Even using a battery tender I seem to go through batteries faster than I'd like. I needed to buy a new battery anyway so the incremental cost was less than the new cost. I've only had this battery for a couple months so the jury is still out.

It is crazy light and small; I had to shim it in the battery compartment with a piece of wood. It's certainly a luxury item, but at this point I'm happy with it.
 

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I have the Anti-Gravity YTX12-16, bought from Amazon. I don't run a lot of stuff, but it works fine with my winch and extra lights.

I went lithium because my Grizzly frequently sits unused for a month or two at a time, and I was tired of the battery always being dead. Even using a battery tender I seem to go through batteries faster than I'd like. I needed to buy a new battery anyway so the incremental cost was less than the new cost. I've only had this battery for a couple months so the jury is still out.

It is crazy light and small; I had to shim it in the battery compartment with a piece of wood. It's certainly a luxury item, but at this point I'm happy with it.
Thank you for that review. I do want to trim some weight and free up some space under the hood. But I also don't want to be under powered.
 

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I just bought a Shorai LFX36L3-BS12 Lithium Iron Phosphate for my 2002.
Haven't installed it yet. The Griz sits at my mountain cabin for long periods, and I go through Yuasa AGM lead acid batteries about every two years due to long storage times and extremely high temps during the summer.

Hoping the Lithium will work well for storage issue and high heat resistance. Not sure how well it is going to work for long-pull winching, so I am looking to add a dual battery isolator setup and keep the AGM as a back-up.

The Shorai LFX36L3-BS12 is rated 540 CCA which is way more than the Yuasa AGM.
It is the same height as stock, so the stock mounting bracket should work fine.
Size is 6.55"L x 3.4"W x 6.1"H, and weighs 4.55Lbs.
It is expensive, but will pay for itself over the long haul. I also bought the special Shorai charger for it.

I have good long term experience with a Lithium battery in my 2009 YZF-R1, which also cooks batteries, just like my '02 Grizzly.

Would like to hear from other forum members how well the Lithium's work under winching conditions.
 

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I have been using Shorai batteries for about four years in my 650 BMW. It starts the bike amazingly better than the lead acid battery that came in the bike. It is also seven pounds lighter than the stock battery. It also costs about $100 more than the stock battery! That is a lot of money, but it starts the bike so much better it is worth it to me.

You have to be careful not to let these batteries get ran all the way down. According to the Warranty documentation and folks I have talked to if you let them get ran down to almost nothing the chip inside records this and when it is returned for warranty they will not give you another one. I ran my first Shorai battery down to nothing twice. The bike sit for about 6 months and the clock ran it down the first time. I installed a USB outlet that had a LED light that ran the battery down overnight the second time. I had to put a small 2 amp charger on the batteries for a few hours before the battery would work again.

After the first time I purchased the $75 Shorai charger/maintainer. It would not charge the discharged battery after the USB outlet problem, therefore I used the regular old 2 amp charger to get it to a point the Shorai charger/maintainer would work.

Now that I have learned, I make sure the bike is connected to the charger/maintainer on my second Shorai battery. No problems with the second battery at all. No chance of it running down to nothing and blasting the warranty. Shorai says their batteries will stay charged for months, but also says to connect it to their charger/maintainer if the bike is going to sit for more than a few days.

My 2017 700 Grizz starts just fine and the winch works great with the stock battery. I used a Yuasa AGM battery in my old 600 Grizz that I occasionally put a battery tender on it, it lasted for years.

I have had good luck with battery tenders and have several vehicles connected to one right now, even a car! If I had a vehicle that was stored without electricity available, I would take the battery out and put it on a battery tender at home.

After all that, my 2 cents is, Shorai batteries are great when properly cared for, but I am not going to spend the money for one for my Grizzly.
 

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so I am looking to add a dual battery isolator setup and keep the AGM as a back-up.
I've been researching this and you'll get the best results if you match dual batteries - example: RV & marine applications prefer that both batteries are the same type, same size, and same manufacturer. So, you might consider swapping your starting battery as well...

But I'd love to hear some opposition, since getting two lithium batteries is beaucoup bucks...
 

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I've been researching this and you'll get the best results if you match dual batteries - example: RV & marine applications prefer that both batteries are the same type, same size, and same manufacturer. So, you might consider swapping your starting battery as well...



But I'd love to hear some opposition, since getting two lithium batteries is beaucoup bucks...


I have also heard this. I opted for a dual setup in my wrangler and was told to always stick with the same batteries and whenever possible, get two that were manufactured around the same time. I used yellow tops as my batteries of choice.

I wouldn’t think having one lithium and one non-lithium would be a good idea.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Yeah- I looked into this, and plan to use a manual Marine battery switch to connect The two in parallel only if needed/while winching.

All the dual battery systems using voltage controlled relays won't work properly with different battery chemistries. The resting voltages are too dissimilar to work as intended.

I will charge the secondary battery with a separate charger as needed. The AGM should hold a charge for a long time if disconnected from everything.
 

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Ordered (2) Antigravity Lithium batteries last week, a 125A isolator, and a 120A breaker bus... I can post some pictures later; I plan to stuff the second battery in the rear [2018] cargo compartment.


-Opie
 
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