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Discussion Starter #1
I will be installing my crankcase bearings this weekend and I wanted to test out the heating in the oven method. I have a new wet clutch cover bearing that I can install right now. I heated the cover in the oven at 180 degrees Fahrenheit for 20 minutes and the bearing in the freezer for the same amount of time. Well, the bearing goes in but not all the way. And if I tap it to make it go further, it doesn't move.
Am I doing something wrong? Is the cover not hot enough?

Is there a better way?
 

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That's not a crank bearing. That's just a wet clutch drum shaft bearing.

250 degrees for 20-30 minutes should be enough in the oven. I would be closer to 30 minutes to ensure complete heat soaking.

But 20 minutes in the freezer is nowhere near long enough. It needs to be several hours at a minimum. I always leave it over night to ensure complete cold soaking.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
That's not a crank bearing. That's just a wet clutch drum shaft bearing.
I know. Like I said, I'll be doing the crankcase bearings this weekend (because I don't have them yet). Currently, I have the wet clutch housing bearing that I can install.

I was heating it only to about 180 so that wasn't hot enough. I'll also put the bearings in the freezer longer.

Thanks for the advice Dezz!
Edit :. Sorry @dezz, the wet clutch drum shaft bearing is what I meant. I think I need a break from this for a few days. I'm making up new parts in my posts. And I dream of parts in my sleep....
 

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Thanks for the advice Dezz!
Edit :. Sorry @dezz, the wet clutch drum shaft bearing is what I meant. I think I need a break from this for a few days. I'm making up new parts in my posts. And I dream of parts in my sleep....
LOL.
I am with you on that. Our minds will race every way but the correct way. It happens.
 

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I used a bearing and seal driver or a brass punch on that. Can't remember right now. But I've done ALOT of bearings.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I used a bearing and seal driver or a brass punch on that. Can't remember right now. But I've done ALOT of bearings.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G870A using Tapatalk
Since you've done lots of bearings, maybe you can give me some tips.

Here's the situation: The cases are split and the middle driven shaft is still installed (I don't plan on removing it either). I got the mechanic at the dealer to remove all the bearings including the crank and re-install the new crank and crank bearings. I will be getting the rest of the bearings (transmission and counter balancer) on Friday and would like to install them myself. How would I go about installing them without putting the cases in the oven? (because the middle driven shaft and seals are still in) I have a small propane torch I can use or a heat gun but I don't have an infrared temp gun.

What do you suggest?
 

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The fire and ice is a backyard work around. Using a press is easiest but I also do freeze bearings. The bearing needs to be frozen overnight. Probably don't really need to heat the mating part.
Might consider looking into induction heaters. They can be DIY built and specialized for a specific task.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)

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If you use a bearing and seal driver or a punch just make sure that it's going together square, best thing I can really say without being there. I've used the old bearings to drive in the new ones too, because you only want to hit the race that's pressed in or onto a shaft.

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I just installed the bearing but still had to tap it in with a punch and hammer. At first it started off crooked and I had to tap it back out. I heated the wet clutch drum cover for 30 minutes at 280F and the bearing was in the freezer for 24 hrs. Is this normal for it to NOT just drop in?

It seems that installing the bearings in the cases is gonna be quite a task. If one happens to go in a bit crooked and gets stuck, I'm in for a boat load of cursing because they're blind bearings and I don't have the tool to pull them out. Plus, the bearing heats up pretty quick in the hot case, making it expand. I'm wondering if I should have the dealer install them.

I plan on using a propane torch to heat the spots where the bearings go in the cases (one at a time of course). And the bearings will be in the freezer for at least 12 hrs. I read somewhere that you have to heat the area until water sizzles on the area (dip your finger in water and flick it on the area). Is this a good method?

Heating the cases in the oven is not an option. Any suggestions?
 

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.....
 

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I just installed the bearing but still had to tap it in with a punch and hammer. At first it started off crooked and I had to tap it back out. I heated the wet clutch drum cover for 30 minutes at 280F and the bearing was in the freezer for 24 hrs. Is this normal for it to NOT just drop in?

It seems that installing the bearings in the cases is gonna be quite a task. If one happens to go in a bit crooked and gets stuck, I'm in for a boat load of cursing because they're blind bearings and I don't have the tool to pull them out. I'm wondering if I should have the dealer install them.

I plan on using a propane torch to heat the spots where the bearings go in the cases (one at a time of course). And the bearings will be in the freezer for at least 12 hrs. I read somewhere that you have to heat the area until water sizzles on the area (dip your finger in water and flick it on the area). Is this a good method?

Heating the cases in the oven is not an option. Any suggestions?
The bearings will never just fall in.
That's why you, Heat the casing, freeze the bearing, coat everything with a thin layer of oil, use an old outer bearings race to gently tap the new bearing in once it's placed square in the hole. With experience, it can go very smoothly, but without prior knowledge and the right equipment, it can be a pain in the ass! If you feel over your head, I would suggest you let an experienced shop install them.
 

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^What he said. I've never heated or frozen bearings etc to make this easier, but that's all you're doing it for. You should still have to tap the bearings in. Watch a few videos on it and give it a try. Keep everything square and true and you'll be fine.

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Discussion Starter #16
@dezz apparently you know the answer to this.

I'm not the one who removed the bearings so there's one bearing that I'm not sure about. It's the only bearing that is sealed on one side. I'm assuming that it goes in with the sealed part against the case. Is that right?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I just looked at a bunch of pictures on eBay of Grizzly 660 crankcases with the bearings still installed and in none of them did I see the seal of that bearing so it has to be against the case.

That's the way I'll install it.
 

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Sorry for late response to this. I have just seen it.

You have the bearing installation orientation correct. Seal against the case.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
The bearings are installed!

This is one part of the rebuild that I was most nervous about but it went very well. First, I bought a bearing driver set. I didn't want to use a punch to tap a bearing that might get wedged in crooked so the driver set is a good investment IMO. Bearings don't come cheap.


After thoroughly cleaning, I heated the area with a heat gun (ditched the propane torch idea), never staying stationary in one spot. Gradually building the heat up (about 3 to 4 minutes) hovering about 1 inch from the surface. When it was too hot to keep a finger on it for more than a quick second, it was ready. Then quickly got the bearing from the freezer (they were in there for 24hrs) and put a bit of oil around the circumference. Now this was the most important part, it has to go in straight and as level to the case as possible. Then repeated those steps for each bearing. I had a bit of trouble with 3 of them (really glad I had the driver set!) but the rest dropped right in! That distinctive "I've hit bottom" sound was so satisfying when the first one just dropped in. The ones that I had a bit of trouble with was surely because the area was not hot enough. They went in a bit tight but seated nicely on the last tap with the driver.

Now I'm ready to start putting things back together. I'm half way done.
 

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I have similar set of drivers...But there isn't a size to fit our wheel bearings.
 
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