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I just bought a 2019 blue Grizzly last week. If I had known… Does this new one have all the options? Diff lock? Power steering? 3rd headlight? I don’t mind the 12” wheels - I think it has a lot more tire options that way
 

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I just bought a 2019 blue Grizzly last week. If I had known… Does this new one have all the options? Diff lock? Power steering? 3rd headlight? I don’t mind the 12” wheels - I think it has a lot more tire options that way
It's got everything a 2019 has, essentially same bike. It's only the eps model so it only has the proper 12" wheels that should be on an atv, unfortunately they are steel.

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
it has the proper 12" wheels that should be on an atv, unfortunately they are steel.

I prefer steel they hold up better and don't leak as much air as aluminum. I bought my Suzuki new in 2007 and it has always been maintained and garage kept. When i replaced the tires on it many years later they aluminum wheels were corroding at the bead and i had to wire wheel them and brush some paint on to try to seal the exposed corroding aluminum. I never had any problems out of my Kawasaki that had steel wheels so aluminum is a downgrade that should come on base models in my opinion.
 

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I prefer steel they hold up better and don't leak as much air as aluminum. I bought my Suzuki new in 2007 and it has always been maintained and garage kept. When i replaced the tires on it many years later they aluminum wheels were corroding at the bead and i had to wire wheel them and brush some paint on to try to seal the exposed corroding aluminum. I never had any problems out of my Kawasaki that had steel wheels so aluminum is a downgrade that should come on base models in my opinion.
Definitely not a downgrade. Speaking from years in the tire industry, starting when aluminum & magnesium wheels were mainly only found on high end vehicles, slowly transitioning to the the rest of the automotive industry. Aluminum wheels are a stronger more resistant way to go. Aluminum only oxidizes so far, then stops, because the oxidation actually creates a barrier protecting the base metal. Steel will oxidize, and continue until there's nothing left.
Steel wheels bend easily causing leaks too.
If your aluminum wheel is leaking air around the bead, it's usually from incorrect install or there is dirt in there forcing the bead away from the rim. Same thing will happen to steel wheels.
Personally, in all the vehicles and atvs I've had over the last 35+ years, i can say I've had far less problems with aluminum rims than i have with steel.
I know this won't change your personal opinion, but it does set facts straight about aluminum vs steel.

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I have never had a problem with steel wheels other than they are ugly, all of my problems have been from aluminum. I had a 1997 Honda Accord with aluminum wheels and to be fair these wheels were well known for corroding badly. I had a friend who worked at a tire shop put new tires on it because i knew the beads were corroded and i knew he would clean them up well and i told him not to be worried about going heavy on the bead sealer. But when he pulled the tires off they were so far gone he said they would never seal. So i went and bought some steel wheels from a junkyard Accord and never had anymore problems.

That same friend had a Suzuki vinson and his caliper came loose and put a dent and crack on the inside of his aluminum wheel. We were planning a riding trip that day so he was trying to figure out a way to fix it so we could ride. This was in summer when the temps were very high and the asphalt roads were bubbling road tar. So i pulled the tire off cleaned the aluminum on the inside of the wheel where the crack was. Then i heated the aluminum up with a propane torch and went out to the road and scraped some road tar off it and packed it in the crack and let it cool. We put the tire back on and it never did leak again. But if the wheel would have been steel it wouldn't have cracked in the first place.
 

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I ride a 2013 550 Grizzly that happens to be blue. Prefer green or gray but blue does look better. Don't hear much about the 550 on this forum. Aside from the additional cc, is there much difference in the rest of the machine?
 

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I ride a 2013 550 Grizzly that happens to be blue. Prefer green or gray but blue does look better. Don't hear much about the 550 on this forum. Aside from the additional cc, is there much difference in the rest of the machine?

I bought my Vinson in 2009 (same year the Grizz 550 came out). I looked into the Grizz 550 back then quite a bit the the Vinson was such a good deal and it was foot shift and i preferred it at the time. I remember the Grizzly 550 being the same ATV as the 700 back then. The only thing that was different was the small displacement jug i think even the crank was the same as the 700. But it's been many years ago so i could be wrong.
 

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I ride a 2013 550 Grizzly that happens to be blue. Prefer green or gray but blue does look better. Don't hear much about the 550 on this forum. Aside from the additional cc, is there much difference in the rest of the machine?
Basically the same machine, minus the smaller cylinder, piston, head, and throttle body.
 

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Speaking about blue and other colors i just saw some blue anodized skid plates for sale. They would be pretty cool looking matched with that plastic.
 
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