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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I will be doing the 1st service on my 2016 Grizzly soon and am a bit confused on the oil to use for the job.

The manual says:

Final drive
Mobilfluid 424

Diff Gear Oil
SAE 80 API GL-4 Hypoid Gear Oil

My dealer told me to use the same oil for Front and Rear Diffs. I have a bottle of this (see pic):
Yamalube Friction Modified Shaft Drive Gear Oil SAE 80-90.

Is this what I use for both Front and Rear?


And a question about 1st service on the Valves. Do they really check them or just listen? Seems like they have to remove a lot of stuff to get at them.
 

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Use the gear oil in front and rear diffs.
The Mobilfluid is used in the Kodiak 700 because it has a wet brake in the rear diff assembly. Regular gear oil cannot be used here because it will damage the wet brake.
Yamaha more than likely just did a copy and paste when making up the new owners manuals for the newer Grizzly and Kodiak's.

Checking the valves properly requires taking a measurement using a feeler gauge at the rocker arm. So it requires taking off all the stuff in order to do. If the valves require adjustment, with the newer 708cc engine, even more stuff has to come off. It's a labour intensive check.
 

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Had my first service dealer didnt change diff oils done it at home myself and when i asked about checking valves the machanic said he had never ever checked them on sny quad. Not happy

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Had my first service dealer didnt change diff oils done it at home myself and when i asked about checking valves the machanic said he had never ever checked them on sny quad. Not happy

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Unfortunately this is a very common practice at most dealers, mainly due to the rarity of finding valves out of adjustment. On top of that, many dealers will not actually do the check, but they still charge you for it.
Additionally, most owners do not like paying big bucks to perform a maintenance item on their basically new bikes. They'll bitch, complain and argue with the dealer.....and in most cases will not get it done.
 

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On my old 660 I took in for valve adjustment once it became hard to start, that was what the dealer suggested, on the 2017 plan is to follow the same guidelines ( not cheap to do by a dealership) unless enlightened here:)
 

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Had my first service dealer didnt change diff oils done it at home myself and when i asked about checking valves the machanic said he had never ever checked them on sny quad. Not happy

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At least he's honest. That's way more than you'll find many places. If taking it in for a dealer to do maintenance (which I highly discourage), mark your plugs, air box and so on in some way that you know they actually did something. Plastic caps on hex head bolts, plumbers puddy in allen key holes and so on. Unfortunately, I can't take credit for this idea. TRev gave me the idea after I found that my dealer didn't grease our RZR at the break-in service and I highly suspect they didn't do anything else either. This service was negotiated into the sale or it would never have been there at all. TRev caught a dealer's mechanic lying when he had done this to his machine. The manager was not pleased and TRev ended up with a sizeable store credit out of the deal. No dealer wants complaints going to a manufacturer about dishonest business practices. Especially when there's proof.
 

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The owner's manual says to check valves first at 20 hours and then every 160 hours or 1600 miles. A few people have said it is very unusual for the valves to be out of adjustment at 20 hours. I did mine at 90 hours and 1600 miles. You need to buy a $15-20 gasket for the valve cover and have an inch-foot torque wrench. Get a shop service manual. As said before you have to take off a lot of parts to get to the engine. It is not too difficult, one piece at a time. I found my valve clearance to be at the lower limit of normal. I will check them again in 160 hours.

Listening for valve clearance is not helpful as the valves on the 708 engine generally get tight, not loose. As mentioned, tight valves can be a cause of starting problems. I don't want to be caught out in nowhere with the engine not starting. You can also burn valves if too tight.

It is a real pain to adjust the valve clearance on the 708 engine. The camshafts have to be removed. Tiny shims have to be replaced with the correct size to obtain the correct valve clearance. I am a bit jealous of those with the 686 engine--the valves are easy to adjust.
 
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