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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, so last time I was out on my grizz, I realized that I was always having to push it one way to stay straight. Any help would be appreciated.:grin2:
 

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After tire pressure, check your toe-in.
 

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If this happened all of a sudden, then it is a failure issue....not am alignment issue.
Tire pressure, wheel bearing, dragging brake or cv joint failing.
Because it's a constant, I suspect low tire pressure.
 

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Before I put A-arm guards on I used to have to adjust my toe in after hitting big rocks that bent my A-arms slightly.

Obviously it would be better to replace a bent component. But if it's only slightly bent one could adjust it out and keep using it for a while.

Anyway checking the toe is one way to find out if you do have bent stuff, and it is cheap and easy to check.

But yeah it's probably just low tire pressure on one corner.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'll check the pressure. I think it has been doing it for awhile and I just didn't realize it. Thanks.
 

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A low rear tire will cause the griz to pull, so check the rear tires for equal tier pressure. I have had a low rear tire on the trail without a compressor and just let the high pressure tire down to match the low tire and the pulling stopped to get back to the truck.
Also, many members have found a failed front wheel bearing allowing the toe to be off. You may have to check the front hub by hand, not just pull on the tire, to feel a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A low rear tire will cause the griz to pull, so check the rear tires for equal tier pressure. I have had a low rear tire on the trail without a compressor and just let the high pressure tire down to match the low tire and the pulling stopped to get back to the truck.
Also, many members have found a failed front wheel bearing allowing the toe to be off. You may have to check the front hub by hand, not just pull on the tire, to feel a problem.
A low rear tire. Hmm. I will have to check the bearing because it clunkes up front, and people said that could the problem. Maybe kill two birds with one stone. I pulled the tire and I got nothing and was dissapointed... Does that sound weird? I will have to take the tire off. I just might change the brake fluid while I'm there.
 

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A low rear tire. Hmm. I will have to check the bearing because it clunkes up front, and people said that could the problem. Maybe kill two birds with one stone. I pulled the tire and I got nothing and was dissapointed... Does that sound weird? I will have to take the tire off. I just might change the brake fluid while I'm there.
It could be a bearing, I was adding another cause for a grizz pulling to one side. I had this happen when I left the grizz in the truck over night to go riding the next day. I didn't give it a good walk around and didn't see one of the rear tires was low from the day before. After a couple miles of pulling on the bars I got off to see what was different and I saw a low rear tire. Instead of going back I let air out of the other tire and finished the day.
As for checking the wheel bearing, I had a situation where I couldn't feel a bad bearing by hand but as I pulled the hub the bearing fell apart in my hand. Sometimes you just have to take shit apart to find the problem.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Will do. I am sick right now but I will work on it soon.
 
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