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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking for a new trail quad that can handle off cambers and steep hills. My old ATV is a 2007 Suzuki Vinson and it getting old and it was never very stable on trails with a lot of hills and off cambers because of it's rear swing arm. I have looked into ATV's a little and i have ruled out Honda because i do not want a swing arm rear suspension. I have narrowed my search down to 3 ATV's Yamaha Grizzly, Yamaha Kodiak and Suzuki 750 King Quad.

I have owned Kawasaki and Suzuki in the past so i was wanting to try out Yamaha. The Grizzly and Kodiak seem to have the same engine so im not really sure whats different between them besides that the Grizzly has 26" tires and the Kodiak has 25" tires. Right now my Suzuki Vinson has 25" grim reaper tires and traction is rarely a problem because i do not do deep mud very often. Most of my riding is on dirt trails with steep hills. The Kodiak has the lowest seat height which would give it a lower center of gravity and make it feel more stable on hill climbs. I am a little worried the Grizzly will end up being way to tall and feel unstable on hills.

Does anyone have experience with the Grizzly vs the Kodiak or even the King Quad?
 

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Welcome to GC and the either of the three would be a good choice , as far as differences between the Kodiak and Grizzly do a quick search there is lots of good info about that that's too much to type.
 

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Welcome from Colorado.
Low to the ground sucks around here, a Yamaha or Suz can climb about the same until the trails are rutted or there are rocks. Then the taller machine is best.
 

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2021 Grizzly SE, 2018 Kodiak 700 SE
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I have a 2018 Kodiak 700 SE and a 2021 Grizzly SE. the Grizzly is 2 inches wider than the Kodiak and you can feel it on off cambers. I prefer the Kodiak for tight trails and technical hill climbs. Either one would be a good choice.
 

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I have a '19 Grizzly 700, and my friend has a '20 Kodiak 700. I could see myself owning a Kodiak, it's performance is very close to the Grizzly, but I prefer the Grizzly. The brakes are better on the Grizzly, but the rears on the Kodiak, under normal operation, are supposed to be maintaince free. They work good, but the Grizzlies are better. I feel like I could ride the Grizzly harder, especially in corners, mostly because of the with. My buddies Kodiak didn't have power steering, so it did handle differently. As far as hills, I feel like the Grizzly and Kodiak will feel the same, depending on obstacles. As far as you ride within your abilities, you should be fine. Either one is a great trail machine, but the Grizzly is going to be more money.

As far as the Kingquad, I nearly bought one instead of the Grizzly, it was close. I was just sold on the Special Edition Blue that the Grizzly was offering, plus it came with aftermarket tires from the factory, and sweet looking rims. I have ridden an older 500 Kingquad, and I liked it. It handled well, and seemed to be a very capable machine. It just didn't have the power I would have wanted, being a 500. Even compared to the Rincon I had at the time, that people complained were underpowered and geared too high, it didn't have the low end it probably should have had. I'm sure the 750 would have been what I would have been looking for in terms of power.

I don't think you could really go wrong with either ATV, your best bet is find a dealership that will let you do test ride, or find a friend that has one and get some seat time. I only had ridden a '16 Kodiak before my purchase, but I don't have any regrets. Just wish it had more power.

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Discussion Starter #6
The trails i ride are pretty rutted but i pick lines that wont hang up my Suzuki on 25's and i have never had a problem. I have the shocks cranked all the way down on it to make the suspension flex more. When i ride mud or snow i crank them up to get more ground clearance.

The hilly areas i ride are really sketchy where you feel like your at the tipping point of flipping. Especially going downhill because there can be somewhat of a vertical drop so you have to gas it a bit to make sure it dont end up on it's lid.

And my Suzuki dont handle off cambers well at all because of it's swing arm makes it lift tires a lot. The guy i ride with had a Can-am outlander 1000 and it's suspension soaks everything up. I have always been big on the Japanese brands though and i have owned Kawasaki and Suzuki so i think it's time to try a Yamaha.

I just seen a video on youtube that said that the Grizzly and Kodiak 700 had the same frame and plastic and the seat height difference was due to extra seat foam is this true? I know the Grizz comes with 26" tires vs the Kodiaks 25's which would effect seat height especially if you had the XTR that has 27's. I do want a low seat height to help center of gravity for technical trails.

I do like the looks of the XTR because i want green plastic and it seems the only color the standard grizz comes in is grey. It just seems the XTR is set up for mud and i dont ride in mud much we mostly do wooded trails.
 

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Without seeing your trails and area its tough to guess at what to recommend, I can tell you I ride against the other makes and the griz is the best. If the others were better I'd have one.
I suggest with anything you get, new tires should be an immediate replacement unless you ride around a nursing home complex.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Without seeing your trails and area its tough to guess at what to recommend, I can tell you I ride against the other makes and the griz is the best. If the others were better I'd have one.
I suggest with anything you get, new tires should be an immediate replacement unless you ride around a nursing home complex.

I have a few pictures but it gets much worse than this, these were easy hills. I am currently running 25" grim reapers and traction is not a problem 99% of the time, flipping it over is my main concern. Which is why i dont want a really tall seat height to keep center of gravity low.



 

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You can do this hill on a highbacked Grizzly.
https://flic.kr/p/mHZfr8 see the oil running down the rocks over there, we ride over it around 1:30 into this video.
As for sidehill riding and tipping over, you can tip one this far and ride on;
https://flic.kr/p/fwP7La
 
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I just seen a video on youtube that said that the Grizzly and Kodiak 700 had the same frame and plastic and the seat height difference was due to extra seat foam is this true? I know the Grizz comes with 26" tires vs the Kodiaks 25's which would effect seat height especially if you had the XTR that has 27's. I do want a low seat height to help center of gravity for technical trails.

I do like the looks of the XTR because i want green plastic and it seems the only color the standard grizz comes in is grey. It just seems the XTR is set up for mud and i dont ride in mud much we mostly do wooded trails.
There is 2" of difference between the Kodiak and the Grizzly. The 27" Zillas on the XTR and SE are actually only about 26 1/4" or so, not a true 27". The seat is noticeably thicker, but it softer. The frame maybe be the same, but the suspension is not. The plastic is similar, but slightly different.

Other than wanting the Blue color scheme, the tires were another reason I bought the SE. I run 2 sets of tires on every ATV I ever owned, because we get a good mix of the seasons in NE Ohio. I run a mud/snow tire and a hard pack summer tire. We run railroad lines to a lot of our local trails, so there is no way I mess with a regular 2 ply factory type tire for long. Easier to skip that step and start with a decent aftermarket.

My ideal terrain is hills, and with a river valley running through town we have a good assortment of them. The Grizzly and Kodiak do great, I think. As long as you have good traction that is. I like out wide the Grizzly is, because I ride aggressively for a utility rider. I really need to get a Raptor to suit my needs, hopefully soon. But the Grizzly does well for me in the meantime.

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Discussion Starter #11
I liked the Titanium Bronze on the 2020 XTR but it looks like it's been replaced for 2021 with Covert Green which i also like. I have always had green ATV's and i want something non flashy that will blend in with the forest (but not camo). I am mostly looking at the XTR i was just worried about how tall it is. none of the ATV dealers have any Grizzlies in stock so it's hard to go take a look at one and sit on it.

All of my previous ATV's have been foot shift and this will be my first belt driven quad. If i buy the XTR it will be mostly for the green plastic and winch not so much the Maxxis Zilla tires which i really dont like because they look like an aggressive mud tire. I dont want to get rid of the factory tires as soon as i buy it so i will probbaly just roll with them. But i have ridden friends quads with aggressive mud oriented tires and they ride like crap and tend to be unpredictable on dirt hill climbs. When an all terrain tire will kind of slip but still move forward paddle tires in my experience seem to just want to bite hard and flip the quad over. Maybe it will be something i can get used to but if i bought new tires for it i would probbaly put 26" Grim reapers on it because i have been really happy with mine. Will dropping a tire size effect anything like clutching? And if i dont like the wide tires on the front could i put 26-8-14 tires on the XTR front wheels or are they wider for the 10" tires it comes with?
 

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@agalloch07

Actually the 27 x10 R 14 zillas ride and steer well on the XTRs. Main reason I didn't stick with them was my area has too much rocks and those big fancy wheels started getting damaged quickly because of little to no rim protection.

At the time I already had square 26x9r 12 Pitbull Growlers set up that I wanted to run witch have superior traction and handling , but ride rougher because of the hard rubber compound vs the zillas softer compound
 

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I think you need to decide what is more important, color or bike features.
I have never had anyone ever care what color my griz is, after the first mud hole they all look the same or you're not trying hard enough. I got a green one for hunting, it doesn't stand out in the woods so the game warden doesn't see it and come snooping around. They use glasses to find you then walk in through your hunting area and screw everything up.
If a good 700 is too tall for you, get a little baby 450. My 5'2" g.f. doesn't have a problem riding a big griz and has never complained it is 'tippy'. The one thing she can do on it is take it out for a couple hours, cover it with mud and not have mud on herself.
As for tires and other features, I looked at a base model with eps to get 12" wheels with cheap tires. The money saved here can be put into mods for the best set-up. If you are financing, you are at the mercy of the company and have very few choices, take what you can get.
These bikes have two clutches, on for the starter and one for the engine crank, the belt rides in pulleys we can modify for better low end performance and higher m.p.g. I learned this because I installed taller tires. It is the diameter that does the most to screw up the performance, not the weight of a tire like some think. I can put 100#s of beer on my front rack and still haul ass, or a big 'f'in rock and not notice a difference in pulling. I do notice the weight causing the bike to roll, but it still hauls ass.
This picture shows the front a-arms, and the hill I am about to go down;
https://flic.kr/p/fr9FzX You can see the a-arms after the rock;
https://flic.kr/p/froXt1 and past the rock ,back up the hill;
https://flic.kr/p/froW7W I am at tree line, the oxygen in the air is down about 44%, so the engine is also down the same amount. I am running 26" O.G.'s, 11% taller than stock for my bike, and with maxed out c.v.t. mods for the pulleys I have no problem. And the rock is full of gold, silver and lead along with a fair amount of quartz crystal and weighs about 200#s.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I think you need to decide what is more important, color or bike features.
I have never had anyone ever care what color my griz is, after the first mud hole they all look the same or you're not trying hard enough. I got a green one for hunting, it doesn't stand out in the woods so the game warden doesn't see it and come snooping around. They use glasses to find you then walk in through your hunting area and screw everything up.
If a good 700 is too tall for you, get a little baby 450. My 5'2" g.f. doesn't have a problem riding a big griz and has never complained it is 'tippy'. The one thing she can do on it is take it out for a couple hours, cover it with mud and not have mud on herself.
As for tires and other features, I looked at a base model with eps to get 12" wheels with cheap tires. The money saved here can be put into mods for the best set-up. If you are financing, you are at the mercy of the company and have very few choices, take what you can get.
These bikes have two clutches, on for the starter and one for the engine crank, the belt rides in pulleys we can modify for better low end performance and higher m.p.g. I learned this because I installed taller tires. It is the diameter that does the most to screw up the performance, not the weight of a tire like some think. I can put 100#s of beer on my front rack and still haul ass, or a big 'f'in rock and not notice a difference in pulling. I do notice the weight causing the bike to roll, but it still hauls ass.
This picture shows the front a-arms, and the hill I am about to go down;
https://flic.kr/p/fr9FzX You can see the a-arms after the rock;
https://flic.kr/p/froXt1 and past the rock ,back up the hill;
https://flic.kr/p/froW7W I am at tree line, the oxygen in the air is down about 44%, so the engine is also down the same amount. I am running 26" O.G.'s, 11% taller than stock for my bike, and with maxed out c.v.t. mods for the pulleys I have no problem. And the rock is full of gold, silver and lead along with a fair amount of quartz crystal and weighs about 200#s.

I am really set on green just because i prefer it and i can use it for hunting. I really dont like the grey plastic that comes on the base model and i have always hated red. I could probbaly settle for blue because i kind of like it but i just want a green atv.

First ATV i ever owned was a 300cc Kawasaki Bayou then a 500cc Suzuki. I want more power so there is no way im going down to a 450 i have no intention of doing any power mods to it i am leaving it 100% stock.

I am paying cash but a friend of mine told me they would be more likely to wheel and deal with me if i financed it. My friend that bought a 1000 outlander XT-P got his for about $2,000 less than msrp, about 10K. And he has 91horsepower, better rear suspension and adjustable FOX shocks with remote reservoirs. I thought the Grizzly would have FOX shocks on it for the price they are asking and it only has something like 58hp. If Can-Am were a Japanese company i would seriously consider an Outlander but i just dont know enough about them. My friends have ridden Polaris for years and they were all junk they would work on them more than ride. My Suzuki is 14 years old and has been very reliable i haven't had to do much to it besides general maintenance. If the Grizzly 700 will last me 14 more years it will probbaly be the last ATV i ever own so i dont mind spending a little extra to get what i want on it.
 

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@agalloch07 For your off-camber mention, I would def consider going with the Grizzly vs. Kodiak because of the 2" wider stance. I recall the Grizzly and Kodiak frames are different because they carry different part numbers but one could consider a Kodiak 700 more similar to the 07-13 Grizzly 700/550 width because all of the a-arms are the same, previously mentioned in this thread. That also results in a tighter turning radius when compared to 2014+ Grizzly 700s.
 
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@agalloch07 For your off-camber mention, I would def consider going with the Grizzly vs. Kodiak because of the 2" wider stance. I recall the Grizzly and Kodiak frames are different because they carry different part numbers but one could consider a Kodiak 700 more similar to the 07-13 Grizzly 700/550 width because all of the a-arms are the same, previously mentioned in this thread. That also results in a tighter turning radius when compared to 2014+ Grizzly 700s.
Earlier grizzlies had a tighter turning radius than the new ones? Seems like being 2" wider than the old ones would effect it some.

My Suzuki steers really well without power steering. If the steering geometry was as good on the Grizz as it is my my Vinson i wouldn't even need power steering. By a friend of mine used to own a Can-Am 800 Renegade without power steering and it was the worst steering ATV i have ever ridden. After a day of riding you could feel it in every back and shoulder muscle you had. That's why when he got his new Outlander 1000 he made sure to get it with power steering.
 

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Earlier grizzlies had a tighter turning radius than the new ones? Seems like being 2" wider than the old ones would effect it some.

My Suzuki steers really well without power steering. If the steering geometry was as good on the Grizz as it is my my Vinson i wouldn't even need power steering. By a friend of mine used to own a Can-Am 800 Renegade without power steering and it was the worst steering ATV i have ever ridden. After a day of riding you could feel it in every back and shoulder muscle you had. That's why when he got his new Outlander 1000 he made sure to get it with power steering.
The Grizzly has a turning radius of 146", an the Kodiak is 126", from their website. So, nearly 2ft of difference. It was annoying when I first got mine, but I got used to it quickly.

My Rincon, in its heyday, was the easiest steering 4x4 ATV I had riden. I had ridden most of the brands ATVs of that time ( early 2000s to before entering had power steering lol) besides Can-ams. The only Suzuki I had riden was a Kingquad 450AXI. I always felt that my Rincon handled best. But, I was used to it, and maybe biased, I don't know. But, after the Grizzly, I'm spoiled. It's so effortless, that when I jump onto a non powered ATV, I feel like a wuss, for a few minutes. I doubt I will ever buy another 4x4 without it. I may have to agree about non power steering Can-ams though. My buddy has an Outlander 570, and it feels terrible. Even compared to my 13 year old Rincon. The Base model Kodiak, does handle pretty well without it.

Years ago, when Suzuki first came out with their power steering units, I talked to the Suzuki guy at the International Motorcycle Show. He said they had to make the Kingquad handle worse, to make the power steering effective enough to not give oversteer. So, there maybe some truth behind the good Suzuki handling.

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The Grizzly has a turning radius of 146", an the Kodiak is 126", from their website. So, nearly 2ft of difference. It was annoying when I first got mine, but I got used to it quickly.

My Rincon, in its heyday, was the easiest steering 4x4 ATV I had riden. I had ridden most of the brands ATVs of that time ( early 2000s to before entering had power steering lol) besides Can-ams. The only Suzuki I had riden was a Kingquad 450AXI. I always felt that my Rincon handled best. But, I was used to it, and maybe biased, I don't know. But, after the Grizzly, I'm spoiled. It's so effortless, that when I jump onto a non powered ATV, I feel like a wuss, for a few minutes. I doubt I will ever buy another 4x4 without it. I may have to agree about non power steering Can-ams though. My buddy has an Outlander 570, and it feels terrible. Even compared to my 13 year old Rincon. The Base model Kodiak, does handle pretty well without it.

Years ago, when Suzuki first came out with their power steering units, I talked to the Suzuki guy at the International Motorcycle Show. He said they had to make the Kingquad handle worse, to make the power steering effective enough to not give oversteer. So, there maybe some truth behind the good Suzuki handling.

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I never even thought about turning radius i didn't even know they gave stats for it. My Vinson seems to turn tight and i looked it up and it's turning radius is 9.8 foot. That is pretty close to the Kodiaks 126" which is 10.5 feet. The Grizzly comes in at 12.1 feet, not sure how much i will notice that. There are some things i really dislike about the Kodiak the first being the sealed wet rear brake. That alone is enough to make me not buy it because i dont want to have to pull the diff apart to replace "pads". I replace the brake pads on my Vinson about every year but i use cheap chinese ebay sintered metal pads that cost about $8.

I also have to replace the wheel bearings every few years and i use cheap chinese bearing kits but they seem to hold together relatively well for the price paid for them. I used to ride a lot of deep mud so the factory bearings did not last long. And it wore grooves in the hubs so dirt eventually finds it's way in anyways so i dont buy expensive bearings.
 

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Just some thoughts - If you're afraid of the Kodiak because of the sealed brake and wheel bearings, I believe the sealed rear brake is really designed to last the life of the machine (or very close). Yamaha also uses very high quality Koyo brand wheel bearings. Since you don't ride much mud anymore, you would likely go thousands of miles on a Kodiak or Grizzly before needing to replace the bearings.
 
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Earlier grizzlies had a tighter turning radius than the new ones? Seems like being 2" wider than the old ones would effect it some.
I do not know what the turning radius is but I do know my 07 Grizzly 700 did turn tighter than my current 14 Grizzly 700 which has the wider suspension. Is it an issue for me? No, not at all because I really like the wider stance for trail riding especially in off camber situations. The bike just feels more planted.
 
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