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Hey guys. I’m gonna be purchasing a new 2018 Yamaha Grizzly 700 SE and I’d like to get a nicer set of wheels and tires. I only trail ride and plow my driveway, I do not mud bog at all, too much of a clean freak for that lol.

I’m leaning towards this setup in the YouTube video below, they are 14” HD Alloy rims with 28” Mega Mayhem tires. Is this a bad idea for what I use my quad for? Will I have to do some clutching with this wheel setup? Also will it be a bumpy ride? Would still like it to ride smooth on the trails if that’s possible with this setup? Any feedback would be great. Should I go wider in the back too? Really unsure, just like the look..

https://youtu.be/zUd2MovMD84 Yes i do realize this isn’t the se model, but should still work I’m guessing?
 

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Budget?

28" tires you will want a shim and possibly different spring and weights, from everything I have read around here.
 

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Welcome to GC. If trail riding is your thing and mud isn’t, you should go for a more trail oriented tire. A quick search here will give you probably thousands of tire threads. Look at guys signatures also to see what they run. My riding is similar to yours. I don’t look for mud but don’t drive around regular trail mud either. I and several others run Bighorns but there’s lots of great options to choose from. Also, carefully consider tire size. You don’t want to get a tire that’s too tall and be stuck with it. Be aware that tires often run shorter or taller than their stated size. For example, the tires that will come on your 2018 will not be 26” tall. If you have a question about a tire that you can’t find an answer to, feel free to ask.
 

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I agree with above comments and keep in mind if you don't upgrade the clutch a lot more low gear riding would be needed. If smooth riding is wanted keep in mind a 12" rim rides a little better in general than a 14" rim.
 
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All of the above. I will say that I think the STI Black Diamond XTR would be a good fit for your uses. Swamp lites are a nice tire as well. But that is where this starts getting ugly. It becomes the Bighorn advocates vs, well, almost everyone else. Now don't get me wrong, it's not like we are in mortal kombat or anything. Just have different budgets etc. But that is a different thread. Back to this one. I would stay with 12" rims for a plusher ride. Clutch work would be a must for me but not a NEED for you... It will save your wet clutch quite a bit of work and wear though.
 

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For your uses, I think there are better options out there than the ITP Mega Mayhem's. It's not they are bad tires (they are actually really good tires), but they are for more soft ground, mud oriented use.
For your uses, look into a more all-terrain knobby tire.

Because of the huge amount of available tires, it would be best to tell us exactly what kind of terrain you ride, what you want from a tire and your budget. That will help us narrow down the options for you.
 
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Welcome from Colorado.
For trail riding and drive-way plowing, there is no better tire than the O.G.'s.
If I had to sacrifice and go with anything else for your stated use, the P.B. Rocker would be my second choice.
As the tire sidewall is part of the total suspension, I highly recommend staying with a 12" wheel diameter.
For those that don't know the true diameter of their stock tires, measure the roll-out and put that number in this table to calculate the EXACT tire diameter for comparing later to the tires you end up replacing the stock tires with.
Circle And Sphere Calculator

The deal is;
Your stock tires may only be 25" tall true, and the stock drive system is engineered for the stock tires and the average ho-hum ride experience.
I run the O.G. tires for 12" wheels, and the 26" O.G.'s are actually 26.5"s tall, and the 27" O.G.'s are true to stated size.
This is important because the pulley ratio is engineered for shorter tires and the taller tires drag the system down. Yes a grizz will move after adding taller tires, but without C.V.T. mods the wet clutch is under more strain. In my opinion taller tires increase the ho-hum, and here at altitude the ho-hum is greatly increased.
When the grizz is new, many don't feel anything going on with their new wet clutch, but after some time many members have reported their wet clutch needs parts replaced.
Raising the pulley ratio by the same percentage as the tire diameter increase from the taller tires restores the low end pull back to the stock feel.
Then, if you increase the ratio by shims or machining, which magnifies the available torque to the belt, the belt may slip in the pulleys, and this belt slip can be stopped adding a heavier secondary spring.

Changing the weights is for more sophisticated Grizzly C.V.T. set-up changes producing much higher ratios than can be achieved by shim alone.
 
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I have three sets, so if you aren’t using them for mud riding, want to steer you away from those. I have my SE set that came with it, which are great for riding around on the streets since I don’t care how long they will last. I then got some 28 inch Zillas for mud riding on 14 inch ITP Hurricanes. I did all kind of mods where they rode good bring the power to ratio back up. But they aren’t comfortable for trail riding and normal riding conditions.
I bought a set of 26 inch Arisen Brusier XT after watching a YouTibe on Dirt Trax on them for a Grizzly. I put these on 12 inch Hurricanes and love this set up. They are 8 ply and great sidewall protection. Heavy but the exact same weight as my Zilla setup. So even though they would be 26 inch on 12 inch wheels just like the stock you will still need to do a few mods to your clutch.
Just a shim and spring would be good, unless you go out and do everything else like I did including the milled sheave, slug kit and all.
Listen to Ridgeway and others on here. He along with them knows everything about it, and helped me and several others on here.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Dang, I was hoping i wouldn't have to do anything with clutching. I really liked the look of that setup in the video. I'm not a wrencher at all and wouldn't have a clue if it needs clutching or not. last thing I want to do is wreck it or put more strain on it. most of the trails around here are sand based, and i know 100% I will NOT be doing any mudding at all with it, have no interest in that. Just want to do trail riding like I do on my sled, but in summer with an ATV. was hoping to make the ATV a little flashier that's all then the rims that are on it. but I do know i need tires as i'm worried that the stockers will puncture easily. can I do those 14" rims( i dont think 12" would look as nice) still but with a better/lighter tire and not have to do any clutching or anything?? sorry I'm a newb to all of this, just excited to get one. and it's actually the LE model i'm buying not the SE, got them confused, sorry.
 

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The wheel is not going to make much difference. The fact that you need clutching comes from that you want 28 inch tires. Those tires are going to be heavy. Add to that how much you raise the pulley ratio so much = clutching needed.
 

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What needs to be said is that you do not NEED clutching.....but you will WANT it.

Before re-clutching became a norm for people to do, like it is today, most did not have or do it at all. There used to be 10 of thousands of machines out there riding on heavy mud tires on stock clutching and gearing and having little to no problems. When I was on the Highlifter forum in 2007, one of the most asked questions was what was the biggest tire you could turn on "whatever" model ATV. Clutching was rarely ever talked about at that point, mainly due to the fact it was still expensive to do then and most did not realize how easy it was to do. The mud riding craze was in full swing, and everybody wanted Outlaws or Silverbacks. And nobody wanted to hear that after they spent over $1000 on tires/wheels, now they needed to spend another $250 to turn them. At that point it was proven then a 660 Grizzly would turn 29.5 Outlaws on stock clutching no problem. Thousands were doing it. I even had my 30" Zilla's mounted on my 660 Grizzly for over a year without clutching and without problems. Hell, I ran extremely heavy 28" Highlifter Radial Outlaws on a Polaris 700 and no clutching and never burned a belt....ever. And that bike was known as a belt burner.
NOW....this is not to say you should go right out and buy big tires and not think about it. That is quite the opposite the way you should think. Get your bike on a regular trail with big tires on stock clutching and it becomes an old dog. It's slower accelerating, throttle response is slower, slower top speed and generally less exciting to ride in trail conditions. Basically, outside of low range slow going, it's no fun. And it does add extra wear and tear on your clutches, more specifically the wet clutch (on machines with a wet clutch setup, like our Yamaha's).
Re-clutching to your specific setup fixes all this.

Best advice we can give you is get the tires you want first. Then take care of your clutching after. Basic clutching is cheap and easy to do.
 

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Keep the 26s and put Big Horns on, they work great for plowing
 

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I have a 550 and with 28” Zillas on 14” MSA M20 Rims. Looks great but drastic performance difference from stock. I am clutched which helps for sure but if I did it again I would choose 26” since im underpowered. But a 700 can spin 28” Zillas and 14” Rims all day. Throw in an orange spring and .5 shim and the difference from stock will be insignificant with the look you want.
 

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........
 

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What needs to be said is that you do not NEED clutching.....but you will WANT it.

Before re-clutching became a norm for people to do, like it is today, most did not have or do it at all. There used to be 10 of thousands of machines out there riding on heavy mud tires on stock clutching and gearing and having little to no problems. When I was on the Highlifter forum in 2007, one of the most asked questions was what was the biggest tire you could turn on "whatever" model ATV. Clutching was rarely ever talked about at that point, mainly due to the fact it was still expensive to do then and most did not realize how easy it was to do. The mud riding craze was in full swing, and everybody wanted Outlaws or Silverbacks. And nobody wanted to hear that after they spent over $1000 on tires/wheels, now they needed to spend another $250 to turn them. At that point it was proven then a 660 Grizzly would turn 29.5 Outlaws on stock clutching no problem. Thousands were doing it. I even had my 30" Zilla's mounted on my 660 Grizzly for over a year without clutching and without problems. Hell, I ran extremely heavy 28" Highlifter Radial Outlaws on a Polaris 700 and no clutching and never burned a belt....ever. And that bike was known as a belt burner.
NOW....this is not to say you should go right out and buy big tires and not think about it. That is quite the opposite the way you should think. Get your bike on a regular trail with big tires on stock clutching and it becomes an old dog. It's slower accelerating, throttle response is slower, slower top speed and generally less exciting to ride in trail conditions. Basically, outside of low range slow going, it's no fun. And it does add extra wear and tear on your clutches, more specifically the wet clutch (on machines with a wet clutch setup, like our Yamaha's).
Re-clutching to your specific setup fixes all this.

Best advice we can give you is get the tires you want first. Then take care of your clutching after. Basic clutching is cheap and easy to do.
Well said, dezz.

If you want 14’s and gigantic mud tires for the looks, go for it. Just know that’s not the best setup for trail use but it WILL get you down the trail. And as has been said, clutching is cheap and easy but must be done right. There’s threads here on that. Basic tools, a simple made tool and a good torque wrench are all that are necessary. I know your not a wrencher but I bet you know one or two. Get some help and / or borrow some tools if needed.
 

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Dang, I was hoping i wouldn't have to do anything with clutching. I really liked the look of that setup in the video. I'm not a wrencher at all and wouldn't have a clue if it needs clutching or not. last thing I want to do is wreck it or put more strain on it. was hoping to make the ATV a little flashier that's all then the rims that are on it. but I do know i need tires as i'm worried that the stockers will puncture easily. can I do those 14" rims( i dont think 12" would look as nice) still but with a better/lighter tire and not have to do any clutching or anything?
It's your bike, and after you add taller tires and shinny wheels, if you like the result, leave it alone.
You asked a couple questions, that got you several replies because several members have experienced adverse effects from adding taller tires.
I for one, ended up with a grizz that would not pull a sick 60 year old off the pot in low range. I know, I had a sick 60 year old hold on to a rope tied to the rear rack and she was able to stop the grizz from leaving.
I live at 7000 ft., and ride to above 13,000 ft. so the loss of power from the air, coupled with the extra roll-out from the tires, made my 660 dangerous to ride in many areas around my local area.
As for not wanting to wrench, I suggest you think about that some. What if something breaks on the trail? Is there going to be someone come along in a while to help?
I suggest everyone learn basic repair skills, and then learn a little about the different systems on their bike.
As for don't want to put more strain on it, know, taller tires do just that, but some riders don't mind putting around.
I ride with others that say, 'it doesn't need work' when in reality they are to cheap to buy parts.
I'll promise you this, if a grizz came with a machined sheave and some shim with a stiffer spring, they would like their grizz a lot more.
As for the weight of the tire, that is of very little importance as compared to the diameter of the tire.
My stock tires moved the grizz 74"s ahead every time the axle turned, and the new tires moved the grizz 83"s ahead every time the axle turned. This was moving the grizz 11% percent further down the trail without adding engine power to the axle.
This was the rolling resistance holding the grizz back.
As for more bling with more wheel material, all we meant was less sidewall meaning a stiffer ride in many conditions.
 
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