Yamaha Grizzly ATV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Picked up a set of Outlaw 2’s 29.5x9.5x14 front and 29.5x11x14 rear for so cheap I couldn’t live with myself if I passed it up. Got the 2” highlifter to match, as well as shimmed up to 2mm from 1.2mm before w 28x9’s.

I’ve been reading posts here and other grizz oriented sites, and there’s so many mixed answers on these OL2’s and how they are on stock axles.
Things I’ve read;
1. Got 29.5 2’s with no lift and no problems
2. Got em w 2” lift broke axle immediately
3. Ur fine just don’t diff lock in gumbo mud
4. OL2’s won’t turn at all in mud on a 700 grizz
5. 2mm shim + white spring + sheave
6. Literally everything else

Should I just buy axles now to replace future broke ones? Anyone know where to get aftermarket axles for a 21’?
78768B5A-CE23-45AA-A757-CF02F4F81E2C.jpeg
9B9EDEA1-C13F-4DB3-A01D-FEE9CB0B62CE.jpeg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,591 Posts
Get in contact with Arnie Cooper, and get one of his machined sheaves. He'll advise you on want spring to run. Such large tires run the risk of burning up your wet clutch so proper clutching is important.

Also you will likely start braking axles and potentially other things if you go and play hard in mud. Simply the nature of the beast with such builds
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ridgway81432

·
Registered
2020 kodiak 450SE
Joined
·
285 Posts
Throttle control has a lot to do with axle life.
 

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Get in contact with Arnie Cooper, and get one of his machined sheaves. He'll advise you on want spring to run. Such large tires run the risk of burning up your wet clutch so proper clutching is important.

Also you will likely start braking axles and potentially other things if you go and play hard in mud. Simply the nature of the beast with such builds
Thanks for the info! I was already considering having my sheave machined, but I think I’ll get a mod2 with a new sheave, so I’ll have a spare juuuuust in case, lol.
As for finding heavy duty axles, I just cannot seem to find a place that sells em for 2016+ would you happen to know where I could get some?
 

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Throttle control has a lot to do with axle life.
I don’t perceive myself as that throttle happy. I mean, I do like to get in it a bit on some of the steeper hills. I am quite fond of the mud lmao. But not to the insane levels of mudding like you see people on YouTube doing.
So by throttle control, is that all encompassing? Do I have to be a bit easier on it in all situations; mud/rock/hills etc?
 

·
Registered
2020 kodiak 450SE
Joined
·
285 Posts
I don’t perceive myself as that throttle happy. I mean, I do like to get in it a bit on some of the steeper hills. I am quite fond of the mud lmao. But not to the insane levels of mudding like you see people on YouTube doing.
So by throttle control, is that all encompassing? Do I have to be a bit easier on it in all situations; mud/rock/hills etc?
The most important time would be in mud I would imagine. Regular riding.. while there is still more stress on things.. doesn't put nearly the stress on axles as spinning tires like a Wildman through thick mud does.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,897 Posts
I don’t perceive myself as that throttle happy. I mean, I do like to get in it a bit on some of the steeper hills. I am quite fond of the mud lmao. But not to the insane levels of mudding like you see people on YouTube doing.
So by throttle control, is that all encompassing? Do I have to be a bit easier on it in all situations; mud/rock/hills etc?
The deal is with a stock Griz there is slippage of the belt when you get the tires pinned down in rocks or hooked up in thick mud and add full throttle to move. Now with better tires the leverage of the tires is increased against the pull of the engine.
If you add a stiffer secondary spring what becomes the next weak link in the drive line? The axles are probably it. Then if you change the axle angle with a lift the axle problem is magnified.
Over the years other members have then added stronger axles to then find the next weak link in the drive line is located in the transmission, that is if the wet-clutch does not slip.
I learned years ago to use a purple spring that works in 95% of the conditions around here. I would rather the belt slip requiring the winch to get out of a bad place rather than break something, then need the winch. In one situation I still have good a machine after using the winch, the other situation I don't.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Blmpkn

·
Registered
2020 kodiak 450SE
Joined
·
285 Posts
What Jim said.

I'd rather have an axle break than the trans. Its harder to drive home with a busted tranny than a broke axle.
 

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The deal is with a stock Griz there is slippage of the belt when you get the tires pinned down in rocks or hooked up in thick mud and add full throttle to move. Now with better tires the leverage of the tires is increased against the pull of the engine.
If you add a stiffer secondary spring what becomes the next weak link in the drive line? The axles are probably it. Then if you change the axle angle with a lift the axle problem is magnified.
Over the years other members have then added stronger axles to then find the next weak link in the drive line is located in the transmission, that is if the wet-clutch does not slip.
I learned years ago to use a purple spring that works in 95% of the conditions around here. I would rather the belt slip requiring the winch to get out of a bad place rather than break something, then need the winch. In one situation I still have good a machine after using the winch, the other situation I don't.
uneducated questions;
1. the “wet clutch” is referring To the greased outer primary sheave?

2. since finding out where the weak links in the drive line are, what order of upgrading would be the best route then? Is the sheave and spring still the slightly more important thing to do???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,591 Posts
uneducated questions;
1. the “wet clutch” is referring To the greased outer primary sheave?
No that's the primary sheave.

The wet clutch is bathed in engine oil and is the reason why your bike can idle in gear without stalling the engine .

It does this by the way of centrifugal force moving pads outwards at certain rpm, and threw friction transfer torque to the drum which is connected to your primary sheave via shaft.

Your bike idles at 1600 rpms and your
wet clutch generally starts at engaging @ 1800rpms. It's fully locked up by 3300 rpms.

Here's a picture of the wet clutch and drum assembly
100387
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,897 Posts
uneducated questions;
1. the “wet clutch” is referring To the greased outer primary sheave?

2. since finding out where the weak links in the drive line are, what order of upgrading would be the best route then? Is the sheave and spring still the slightly more important thing to do???
To learn how these parts work as a system I suggest you go slow and start with the simple.
Add shim to raise the pulley ratio, 1.7 mm's will be the limit with the grease cover in place. You will feel better low end pull, and if you want more, machining the movable sheave is the best next step. Then if you want to go the next step, combine shim and the machining. Go slow and we can help you with each new step as you get there.
Look in my signature at the different mods currently installed, there are many more things to do as you learn the parts and what does what in the drive system.
 

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
No that's the primary sheave.

The wet clutch is bathed in engine oil and is the reason why your bike can idle in gear without stalling the engine .

It does this by the way of centrifugal force moving pads outwards at certain rpm, and threw friction transfer torque to the drum which is connected to your primary sheave via shaft.

Your bike idles at 1600 rpms and your
wet clutch generally starts at engaging @ 1800rpms. It's fully locked up by 3300 rpms.

Here's a picture of the wet clutch and drum assembly View attachment 100387
Ahhh okay, yeah like I feared, too deep into the guts for me just yet lmao. I appreciate the in depth explanation on how it works and all though! Will be super helpful later on down the road. Cheers!
 

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
To learn how these parts work as a system I suggest you go slow and start with the simple.
Add shim to raise the pulley ratio, 1.7 mm's will be the limit with the grease cover in place. You will feel better low end pull, and if you want more, machining the movable sheave is the best next step. Then if you want to go the next step, combine shim and the machining. Go slow and we can help you with each new step as you get there.
Look in my signature at the different mods currently installed, there are many more things to do as you learn the parts and what does what in the drive system.
I’ve currently got 2mm in there, screws aren’t rubbing cage, and the belt isn’t rubbing case. Btw I do know that 1mm is the shim limit with a machined sheave. And if I’m having my sheave machined, wouldn’t it make more sense to do the spring while it’s opened up?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,897 Posts
Hum......as you had work done on your system and we don't know what happened, I look at it this way.
From years ago all other 700 members installing shim had problems installing 2 m's in a stock system. If your bike was mine I would determine what changed by the work. I know .3 mm's isn't much but it sure caused a lot of problems years ago when others were first shimming 700's. How do you think we learned not to recommend 2 mm's? (Just wondering, are your weight covers still there...are your weights actually 30 mm diameter?)
Next, the belt cannot rub the cover with shim alone.
As for the spring, you make the call. It does save time to do at the same time as other mods, and before I knew better I did the spring with other mods all at one time.
What happened for me was I did multiple mods and the bike didn't respond as I wanted so I took everything back out and started over, one mod at a time to learn and find my best set-up.
Also, I ALWAYS count the ratio after a mod, before the next ride and if the ratio is not as I expect I look for and find the problem. With multiple mods finding a problem can be maddening....or you can forget the counting, go for a ride and when she exploded (like others c.v.t. have done) you can start over with new stock parts. Live and learn and have fun.
 

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Hum......as you had work done on your system and we don't know what happened, I look at it this way.
From years ago all other 700 members installing shim had problems installing 2 m's in a stock system. If your bike was mine I would determine what changed by the work. I know .3 mm's isn't much but it sure caused a lot of problems years ago when others were first shimming 700's. How do you think we learned not to recommend 2 mm's? (Just wondering, are your weight covers still there...are your weights actually 30 mm diameter?)
Next, the belt cannot rub the cover with shim alone.
As for the spring, you make the call. It does save time to do at the same time as other mods, and before I knew better I did the spring with other mods all at one time.
What happened for me was I did multiple mods and the bike didn't respond as I wanted so I took everything back out and started over, one mod at a time to learn and find my best set-up.
Also, I ALWAYS count the ratio after a mod, before the next ride and if the ratio is not as I expect I look for and find the problem. With multiple mods finding a problem can be maddening....or you can forget the counting, go for a ride and when she exploded (like others c.v.t. have done) you can start over with new stock parts. Live and learn and have fun.
ill admit i have not delved into the ratio counting and such. reason being; this bike is a BONE stock 21' grizz 700 xtr, save for 2mm shim (ive read that 2016+ take 2mm no problem) 2" lift, and tires. i bought it brand factory new 2 months ago from a yamaha dealer. so even considering that, there still is a possibility (other than some crazy outlier) that machining, adding a stiffer spring, and 1mm shim will shitwreck the whole clutch????

btw, ive personally done everything on it myself. all bolts are torqued to factory spec, nothing has been misplaced or put together incorrectly. the only time the sheave has been open is when i pulled it the first time to add 1.2mm shim and i thought, to err on the side of caution, i pulled the sheave apart and made sure all the rollers and sliders were properly set. the second time i pulled the sheave was to add another .8mm to make it 2mm. i know without a shred of doubt that the second time it was pulled then reinstalled, it didnt slide and dislodge any weights whatsoever. as far as shimming goes, the thought to go up to 2mm was when i bought the outlaw 2's last week. i read through what feels like 20-30 older threads to know if it will take 2mm. consensus was that it should not be a problem, and just as a precaution, i reinstalled everything and left the outer case off and rotated the sheaves by hand to ensure the grease cover screws didnt not rub at all.

really the only thing i have not done is counting ratio, and from what ive read, if you dont count ratio while its stock, then after mod ratio doesnt help much?
 

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
@mod? my post is under review...?

edit; I’m still very new here lol. Idk how the review system or really anything works, so my bad
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,897 Posts
The ratio is important to understand changes and to expose a problem before starting the engine after a mod is installed. Also I use the term shim equivalents, I have 3 mm's in machining, 1.5 mm's in shim, a 1.5 mm narrower belt and 29 mm weights which is like a 7 mm shim, but not all is from shim alone. Then I use a 2 mm cut cam plate to counter-act some of the low influence for best top end performance.
 

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
The ratio is important to understand changes and to expose a problem before starting the engine after a mod is installed. Also I use the term shim equivalents, I have 3 mm's in machining, 1.5 mm's in shim, a 1.5 mm narrower belt and 29 mm weights which is like a 7 mm shim, but not all is from shim alone. Then I use a 2 mm cut cam plate to counter-act some of the low influence for best top end performance.
Holy shit lol. Is that your grizz drag build? Haha

so I talked to coop earlier, and I ordered myself a shaved sheave, and a EPI pink. Sheave will be ez pz.I have no idea what I’m doing when it comes to the spring, wish me luck! XD

can I measure the ratio without torquing the clutch nut? Since I’ll have it pulled apart for the new sheave and spring anyways, that would be a good time to check stock ratio I reckon
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,897 Posts
Holy shit lol. Is that your grizz drag build? Haha

so I talked to coop earlier, and I ordered myself a shaved sheave, and a EPI pink. Sheave will be ez pz.I have no idea what I’m doing when it comes to the spring, wish me luck! XD

can I measure the ratio without torquing the clutch nut? Since I’ll have it pulled apart for the new sheave and spring anyways, that would be a good time to check stock ratio I reckon
Its not drag built, so here's the short story;
I ran stock a couple year, here at elevations between 6000 ft. and 14,000 ft. most of the time. The elevation caused the engine to be down 24% on a good day do low, and 52% down up high. I got use to how the Griz ran for 1000 miles then I tore a rear stock tire and had to replace the entire set....I wasn't staying with the stock dunflops so......and another part of the story is I hadn't found G.C. to $hit from shinola about the actual working of the Yamaha c.v.t.
The stock tires said 25"s on the sidewall so when I installed the 26" O.G.s I thought I was adding only 1" to the diameter or 3.14"s to the circumference which is a very important fact when starting with a machine down on engine output.
I installed the new tires in the shop, pushed'er out to the driveway and pinned the throttle to throw gravel and.....if I had a rope tied to the rear rack an old woman could have held the Griz in place. I couldn't believe the results of only changing tires, and as luck would have it my buddy had an exact like machine still stock so back in the garage we went and switched wheels and tire between bikes and she pulled lie days of old.....hum?
It was then I starting measuring tires for the exact difference and using the roll-out measurement it turned out the stock tires were not a true 25"s, but only 23.5" true diameter. Then I did the same measurement for the new tires and summmmm-'itch, the new tires were actually 26.5"s tall...damn!
I hadn't added 1 inch but 3"s to the diameter which resulted in an additional 9.4+" to the circumference (distance traveled for one turn of the axle over the ground. The stock roll-out was 74"s and the new roll-out was 83"s!
I then got on the computer and after a couple searches found G.C., and joined to ask w.t.f. was going on. I joined with the name of my town and zip code for screen name, and after a few posts others asked about extreme differences in elevation around here, the problem I was looking to solve without needing to make changes to the drive system during a long ride. I posted pictures of the the area and it turned out there was may in these same conditions so I didn't get much help other than.....and remember back in those days c.v.t. mods were very new to the game.....shim recommendations and a different spring if the belt slipped.
I got some Yamaha shims, a new belt from Dayco thinking just in case, and a purple spring from E.P.I. and when everything was here I ripped the guts out of the c.v.t. and did all three mods before buttoning'er up and pushing her back in the driveway. I hit the gas and crap! there wasn't much difference so back n the garage we when and the think'in drink'in began :) and some more reading here on G.C.
COOP had figured out mods 1 and 2 so got to thinking I couldn't determine the problem without knowing were I started sooooo back into the cover we went, ripped all the new stuff out and went back to stock to count the ratio. This stock ratio is the absolute key knowing what you are doing. I don't care if you cut corners, its your bike and if you want to go through life like a dumb-$hit not knowing, be my guest! But for me, I decided to max this system out, learn how the parts go together so I had the best set-up in the mountains.
I turned out the new belt was wider than the used belt I removed, by about 1 mm, which counter acts the addition of 1 mm of shim...hum?
Yes the stiffer spring probably retards the up-shift some, and yes it might affect the ratio very slightly, but I really learned is how damn sensitive these systems are to small changes like 1 mm of shim. What newbies (experts in the making) do not get is the shim mod is linear. One 1mm isn't much, but another 1 mm actually magnifies the benefit of the first, then like with the 660 which can how 2.5 mm's, the next .5 mm magnifies the results of the first two plus adding for the last .5 mm installed. tested with the stock spring and the purple spring for a year and learned the up-shift change isn't enough to consider, and decided I liked the back-shift rate of the purple so that's what I use today.
After I learned the limits of shim alone for better low end pull, I decided to tear into COOP's mod 2, the cam plate mod. I learned how the shim mod reduces top speed and how much for my area, and also learned how to reduced the m.p.g., I decide to make changes to the top end operating area of the belt placement in the primary sheave. I cut a few cam plates for a 1 mm bend, a 2 mm bend, a 3 mm bend and a 4 mm bend, and started all over with the different combinations.
I learned I could add 2.5 mm's of shim and a 3 mm cut cam plate and the Griz came out the hole nicely, and then the top speed increased and the m.p.g. went up....great!
I then played with lighter weights and the low end was much better as the belt couldn't travel to the outer edge of the primary sheave faces, up to 40 m.p.h. this thing was actually dangerous. It could out corner the big 1000 can hams, diving below one in a corner and when the throttle was pinned she can out-accelerate the big bike. All of this is great, it let me experience the potential of the system but 40 miles to a tank of gas was unacceptable for a good day ride, many can be easily over 120 miles a day. The light weights came out and were sent to another member years ago for his trials, and I decided I needed heavier weights for the true potential of the 660.
I learned I also need more shim equivalents....what?
I started talking to COOP to confirm my ideas (which he was using on race bikes back in the day) and had him machine my primary. We determined the amount I needed for my ideas and 3 mm's was the amount removed from the center of the sheave, to taper to nothing removed at the out edge. It was this work that required me to start thinking in shim equivalents....I can add 2.5 mm's of shim in combination to the 3 mm machined sheave, that is after a lot of work to rub in the belt, so I coined the shim equivalent of 5.5 mm's for other to learn what I did. This term hasn't caught on much, oh well it your bike.
Added to these set-up combinations I have three belt of different width.
Ii have many different combinations with 3 different shims, a machined sheave, 3 belts, 4 cam plates, and 3 different sets of weights and 2 different sets of weight covers. Oh I forgot to mention I turned down a set to 29 mm which is like 1 mm of shim.
Now if I use the machined sheave for 3 mm's, the shorter weights by 1 mm, the narrower belt for 1.5 mm's and 2 mm's of shim I am running 7.5 mm's of shim equivalents for absolutely great out of the mud hole pull in high gear. This thing will easily run 20 m.p.h. and roll up on the rear axle to clear a rock in high gear, it actually runs so will in high I never actually need a low gear. I can run over any/out of any mud hole in the area, get to the highway and without stopping to shift pin the throttle and do the 75 m.p.h. speed limit with throttle let in the bank.
With this good set-up I can get 34 m.p.g. as I cut the cam-plate to start the shim influence reduction at 20 m.p.h. which let the engine run slower once going to save on gas. Then if really need high m.p.g. I can change to a wider belt (I don't have to pull shim) and get the m.p.g. up to 39, which I did a few years ago riding with Hammerhead one day. On that day we did 455 miles, starting at 5:30 am and turning off the engines at 10:30 that night back at camp. That day was witnessed by two other members that shock their heads the next morning when we took off for the next day and another 136 miles. On the long day we carried all the gas needed from camp, there are no towns to ride in in the area we rode. we also had a decent m.p.g. combination in Hammer's 700, so we could go 500 with two bike with what we left camp with.
Drag Built? It can stay with and pass any flat land Grizz with a medium set-up. It will run many miles further than any other bike it runs with, the day of the 136 mile ride I used 4 gallons with out needing the reserve.
I put the c.v.t. combination in the signature to help others learn the potential of their bike. If you take the time to work the parts together the Griz can be much better than stock. These mods don't hurt the basic reliability, but if you max out the low hole pull you can easily break parts, I know.
The system has to be in operating trim to measure the ratio, there are no short cuts for the best.
 

·
Registered
2021 Grizzly 700 XTR, 2mm shim, 2” highlifter, 29.5 OL2 skinny wides, 12 pack of bud light
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Its not drag built, so here's the short story;
I ran stock a couple year, here at elevations between 6000 ft. and 14,000 ft. most of the time. The elevation caused the engine to be down 24% on a good day do low, and 52% down up high. I got use to how the Griz ran for 1000 miles then I tore a rear stock tire and had to replace the entire set....I wasn't staying with the stock dunflops so......and another part of the story is I hadn't found G.C. to $hit from shinola about the actual working of the Yamaha c.v.t.
The stock tires said 25"s on the sidewall so when I installed the 26" O.G.s I thought I was adding only 1" to the diameter or 3.14"s to the circumference which is a very important fact when starting with a machine down on engine output.
I installed the new tires in the shop, pushed'er out to the driveway and pinned the throttle to throw gravel and.....if I had a rope tied to the rear rack an old woman could have held the Griz in place. I couldn't believe the results of only changing tires, and as luck would have it my buddy had an exact like machine still stock so back in the garage we went and switched wheels and tire between bikes and she pulled lie days of old.....hum?
It was then I starting measuring tires for the exact difference and using the roll-out measurement it turned out the stock tires were not a true 25"s, but only 23.5" true diameter. Then I did the same measurement for the new tires and summmmm-'itch, the new tires were actually 26.5"s tall...damn!
I hadn't added 1 inch but 3"s to the diameter which resulted in an additional 9.4+" to the circumference (distance traveled for one turn of the axle over the ground. The stock roll-out was 74"s and the new roll-out was 83"s!
I then got on the computer and after a couple searches found G.C., and joined to ask w.t.f. was going on. I joined with the name of my town and zip code for screen name, and after a few posts others asked about extreme differences in elevation around here, the problem I was looking to solve without needing to make changes to the drive system during a long ride. I posted pictures of the the area and it turned out there was may in these same conditions so I didn't get much help other than.....and remember back in those days c.v.t. mods were very new to the game.....shim recommendations and a different spring if the belt slipped.
I got some Yamaha shims, a new belt from Dayco thinking just in case, and a purple spring from E.P.I. and when everything was here I ripped the guts out of the c.v.t. and did all three mods before buttoning'er up and pushing her back in the driveway. I hit the gas and crap! there wasn't much difference so back n the garage we when and the think'in drink'in began :) and some more reading here on G.C.
COOP had figured out mods 1 and 2 so got to thinking I couldn't determine the problem without knowing were I started sooooo back into the cover we went, ripped all the new stuff out and went back to stock to count the ratio. This stock ratio is the absolute key knowing what you are doing. I don't care if you cut corners, its your bike and if you want to go through life like a dumb-$hit not knowing, be my guest! But for me, I decided to max this system out, learn how the parts go together so I had the best set-up in the mountains.
I turned out the new belt was wider than the used belt I removed, by about 1 mm, which counter acts the addition of 1 mm of shim...hum?
Yes the stiffer spring probably retards the up-shift some, and yes it might affect the ratio very slightly, but I really learned is how damn sensitive these systems are to small changes like 1 mm of shim. What newbies (experts in the making) do not get is the shim mod is linear. One 1mm isn't much, but another 1 mm actually magnifies the benefit of the first, then like with the 660 which can how 2.5 mm's, the next .5 mm magnifies the results of the first two plus adding for the last .5 mm installed. tested with the stock spring and the purple spring for a year and learned the up-shift change isn't enough to consider, and decided I liked the back-shift rate of the purple so that's what I use today.
After I learned the limits of shim alone for better low end pull, I decided to tear into COOP's mod 2, the cam plate mod. I learned how the shim mod reduces top speed and how much for my area, and also learned how to reduced the m.p.g., I decide to make changes to the top end operating area of the belt placement in the primary sheave. I cut a few cam plates for a 1 mm bend, a 2 mm bend, a 3 mm bend and a 4 mm bend, and started all over with the different combinations.
I learned I could add 2.5 mm's of shim and a 3 mm cut cam plate and the Griz came out the hole nicely, and then the top speed increased and the m.p.g. went up....great!
I then played with lighter weights and the low end was much better as the belt couldn't travel to the outer edge of the primary sheave faces, up to 40 m.p.h. this thing was actually dangerous. It could out corner the big 1000 can hams, diving below one in a corner and when the throttle was pinned she can out-accelerate the big bike. All of this is great, it let me experience the potential of the system but 40 miles to a tank of gas was unacceptable for a good day ride, many can be easily over 120 miles a day. The light weights came out and were sent to another member years ago for his trials, and I decided I needed heavier weights for the true potential of the 660.
I learned I also need more shim equivalents....what?
I started talking to COOP to confirm my ideas (which he was using on race bikes back in the day) and had him machine my primary. We determined the amount I needed for my ideas and 3 mm's was the amount removed from the center of the sheave, to taper to nothing removed at the out edge. It was this work that required me to start thinking in shim equivalents....I can add 2.5 mm's of shim in combination to the 3 mm machined sheave, that is after a lot of work to rub in the belt, so I coined the shim equivalent of 5.5 mm's for other to learn what I did. This term hasn't caught on much, oh well it your bike.
Added to these set-up combinations I have three belt of different width.
Ii have many different combinations with 3 different shims, a machined sheave, 3 belts, 4 cam plates, and 3 different sets of weights and 2 different sets of weight covers. Oh I forgot to mention I turned down a set to 29 mm which is like 1 mm of shim.
Now if I use the machined sheave for 3 mm's, the shorter weights by 1 mm, the narrower belt for 1.5 mm's and 2 mm's of shim I am running 7.5 mm's of shim equivalents for absolutely great out of the mud hole pull in high gear. This thing will easily run 20 m.p.h. and roll up on the rear axle to clear a rock in high gear, it actually runs so will in high I never actually need a low gear. I can run over any/out of any mud hole in the area, get to the highway and without stopping to shift pin the throttle and do the 75 m.p.h. speed limit with throttle let in the bank.
With this good set-up I can get 34 m.p.g. as I cut the cam-plate to start the shim influence reduction at 20 m.p.h. which let the engine run slower once going to save on gas. Then if really need high m.p.g. I can change to a wider belt (I don't have to pull shim) and get the m.p.g. up to 39, which I did a few years ago riding with Hammerhead one day. On that day we did 455 miles, starting at 5:30 am and turning off the engines at 10:30 that night back at camp. That day was witnessed by two other members that shock their heads the next morning when we took off for the next day and another 136 miles. On the long day we carried all the gas needed from camp, there are no towns to ride in in the area we rode. we also had a decent m.p.g. combination in Hammer's 700, so we could go 500 with two bike with what we left camp with.
Drag Built? It can stay with and pass any flat land Grizz with a medium set-up. It will run many miles further than any other bike it runs with, the day of the 136 mile ride I used 4 gallons with out needing the reserve.
I put the c.v.t. combination in the signature to help others learn the potential of their bike. If you take the time to work the parts together the Griz can be much better than stock. These mods don't hurt the basic reliability, but if you max out the low hole pull you can easily break parts, I know.
The system has to be in operating trim to measure the ratio, there are no short cuts for the best.
You’ve definitely done your due diligence, props. And lol I didn’t really mean “drag build” but in the very same aspect; if you’re walking the canned hams then she’s not drag built, she’s rocket built haha. Makes me wonder how it would stack up to the sport bikes, like a raptor or a built banshee or sum’n...

and I don’t want you to have the wrong impression of my intent for the final product on my bike. I’ve read at least a thread or two on most of the individual topics you brought up (a lot of it being your posts/comments actually.

There’s a ton of good information, and I can see why it’s more crucial for you, being that a lot of your riding is done in much higher elevation than me (I live on a mtn and I go ride at a place down the road, but I’m only at about 2,000 ft up at most.) and when I do trailer to somewhere out of town, it’s usually a two day ride at most, and something like 70-80mi total.
Really the main goal for me (at least for now) is to minimize any extra wear and tear on the clutch and driveline. 95% of my riding is done under 20-25mph.

So basically, if I can get to where the clutch has its best chance of not being torn to hell, I’m happy with it. Of course the axles will be the victim in the end, but that’s ok, I’ll upgrade to some heavy duties and then roll with the punches there after I guess, lol.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top