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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Yesterday while riding, the Grizzly was making a periodic squealing noise while the engine decelerates - specifically, down a hill while the engine brake should be engaging. I could tell the engine wasn't braking like normal but if I tapped the throttle, it seemed like it would then engage again and slow me down. The squeal during the deceleration was fairly loud.

A few miles after I first noticed the squeal, I was riding at road speeds and lost all power to wheels after a big puff of smoke. After being trailered home, I took it apart to see the shaft in the clutch housing turns but the belt is stationary. It appears the fixed primary sheave was spinning on the shaft as the spines were almost worn out. The grease and the circular weights were very melted down.

Any chance these problems are related? Wouldn't seem so. What I don't understand is why fixed sheave turns freely or how the splines were ground down. The cage and all were completely in tact and the shaft in it turned - just didn't turn the sheave.

Thoughts anyone?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
After looking a little more closely at the fixed sheave, it does appear the splines are worn off. I just looked at the one end but it's smooth in the middle. There are enough splines on the outer edge for it to grab if situated just right but it's not a natural running position. Any ideas what happens that wears these splines down? Something else must be wrong as it was a brand new fixed sheave 500 miles ago.
 

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In most cases, stripped splines happen because of incorrect assembly procedures or an imbalance of the clutch.
Was the primary nut torqued properly using a torque wrench?
The torque wrench calibration could of been off.
Was the primary clutch washer centered before the nut was torqued down?
Was the splines fully engaged on the cam plate and shaft before the washer and nut were installed?

An imbalance could of come from too much grease added to the clutch during servicing.
Did a roller weight fall out of its channel without noticing?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In most cases, stripped splines happen because of incorrect assembly procedures or an imbalance of the clutch.
Was the primary nut torqued properly using a torque wrench?
The torque wrench calibration could of been off.
Was the primary clutch washer centered before the nut was torqued down?
Was the splines fully engaged on the cam plate and shaft before the washer and nut were installed?

An imbalance could of come from too much grease added to the clutch during servicing.
Did a roller weight fall out of its channel without noticing?
Considering I put it together the last time, any or all of those things could have happened. Didn't realize they were so temperamental.

Thanks.
 

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The Yamaha CVT is not that temperamental...Like ever other mechanical system there is always a proper procedure to disassemble and reassemble. The fixed sheave being strip is almost always a result of the nut not being torqued properly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Yamaha CVT is not that temperamental...Like ever other mechanical system there is always a proper procedure to disassemble and reassemble. The fixed sheave being strip is almost always a result of the nut not being torqued properly.
I didn't use a torque wrench - guess I should have....however, I'm still not understanding what happened in terms of it even being in a position to get stripped out. The nut wasn't loose - nothing was loose in there. It was simply spinning on the shaft, of course due to being stripped out.

I feel I'm missing something else going wrong here and I'll put it back together and be in the same situation before too long.
 

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I didn't use a torque wrench - guess I should have....however, I'm still not understanding what happened in terms of it even being in a position to get stripped out. The nut wasn't loose - nothing was loose in there. It was simply spinning on the shaft, of course due to being stripped out.

I feel I'm missing something else going wrong here and I'll put it back together and be in the same situation before too long.
If the outer splines were not engaged on cam plate correctly the inner splines of fixed sheave due all the work and being they are aluminum they strip out.
Never heard of splines ripping out due to an imbalance of too much grease. Not possible.
its always 100% due to incorrect installation.
1/ Due not install with belt on or make sure its lose enough that it doesn't stop sheaves from being tightened.
2/ make sure splines protrude through cam plate
3/ make sure washer is lined up(centred) around splines before you tighten up.
4/ torque nut to correct spec


there are some great videos on you tube showing you the correct procedure how to do these steps correctly


check cam plate and make sure splines are not stripped there or are damaged before you install new fixed sheave
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the info. With the exception of the exact torque, I'm pretty sure I did all of that. I'll give it another whirl.
 
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