Yamaha Grizzly ATV Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2013 550 EPS
It has the original tires. I didnt know jack about ATV tires prior to this. I still dont. It looks like the front are 25x8-12 on 12x6 wheels and the rears are 25x10-12 on 12x7.5 wheels.

My grizzly serves 2 purposes. I use it to drive around the neighborhood to visit my neighbors. It sees a lot of blacktop. In the winter time it goes hunting and sees some trails filled with water and mud. I would say the water is up to the footboards. Maybe less maybe more depending on how much rain and how cold it is. The tires have worn enough that they dont so great in the mud.

I have kept it stock. It has low miles. Maybe 100 hours.

1) Is there a set of tires that perform in the mud but hold up on the blacktop? I am trying to decide if I should buy wheels and tires and swap them out for when I go hunting. Obviously its cheaper buying just tires and you dont have the pain of swapping them. However I dont want to buy something and burn them right down in no time.
2) I believe it was mentioned the stock wheels are 4-3 offset and many of the aftermarket wheels are 5-2 offset. Do I want to keep the original offset or go with this 5-2? Pros? Cons?
3) How important is tire weight with a 550 engine? Should that be a deciding factor?
4) I am considering going with a bigger tire size. Is this a bad idea if you are going to keep the bike stock? If so, what is the reasonable size that doesnt negatively impact the performance of the bike? 26? 27? 28?
5) If I do get wheels, should I stick with the 12" wheels?
6) Do you trust these tire reviews? This is one from Chaparral.
Do they suggest tires that make them more money or sell exclusively?

I did read threads on this. I really would like some feedback from people who have done this and can honestly say what they liked and what they wish they would have done.

Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
:)
I bet this thread causes a few ruffled feathers!
The first thing to point out is your tire are 8 years old, so its not like you have a big annual expense with tires, so don't cheap out.
Then remember your stock tires have a true diameter of 23.5" when new, so the actual size of your new tires is what's most important, not the stated size on the sidewall.
If you like the performance now, the tires are tall enough, then stay with something around 25"s true.
As for pavement wear, I suggest you align your front tires to dead ahead, not towed out like now. I did this and can run pavement for miles and not cause tire wear from scuffing. The set (jamb) nuts to the tie rod are marked with paint, so I loosened the nuts and turned the tie rods a 1/6th turn (one shoulder) then tightened the jamb nut, That got mine dead ahead which I like better.
As for tires, you probably don't want heavy cleats. I like my O.G.'s, they work good on pavement, in mud and over rock. I have 7000 miles on mine in everything but peanut butter mud and they work.
If you go taller than 25"s, we can help you with c.v.t. mods later.
I would stay with the stock wheels.
Let the fight begin!
 
  • Like
Reactions: jvictory1974

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
As for tires, you probably don't want heavy cleats. I like my O.G.'s, they work good on pavement, in mud and over rock. I have 7000 miles on mine in everything but peanut butter mud and they work.
What are O.G.'s? Is that an actual model or a reference to old school or first model tire?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
These are Maxis Big Horn tires, the original model and can be easily identified because of the raised white letters.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
Bang for the buck IMO is the BHOG. 26" tires wouldn't kill too much power and would help with clearance in the mud when hunting. There are lots of cheaper tires out there though if you're on a budget.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Bang for the buck IMO is the BHOG. 26" tires wouldn't kill too much power and would help with clearance in the mud when hunting. There are lots of cheaper tires out there though if you're on a budget.
I am not one that needs to over spend to have the best. However, I dont mind paying for something if it makes sense. Do you typically put these 26" tires on 12" rims? Did you put your 27" tires on 12 or 14 rims?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
You can put any size on a 12" rim, 25 up to about 30s. But ideally, the most common upgrade is going to a 26". The taller the tire, the more you are going to notice power loss turning them. That's why 26 is a safe go to. 25 and 26 true overall diameters are very close and over lap between brands.

If you were on asphalt alot, a good all terrain the is what you want and a radial would give you a better ride and a much longer tread life.
As suggested above, the maxxis bighorn og would be a great choice. Note that not all sizes in the og have white letters. But they will be a long lasting radial with very good traction.

Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,593 Posts
For your specific application, here is a list of tires that have a very good wear rate. They simply last.

Highlifter Outlaw MST
Maxxis Bighorn OG
Maxxis Mudzilla's (not the Zilla's. They are completely different)
ITP 589 M/S (discontinued but some are still around)
ITP Terracrosses
Pitbull tires

This is just to name a few. There are more. Of the list above, the Mudzilla's are the best for muddy conditions. But that is where it stops. And they are heavy.
The Outlaw MST and ITP 589 are also very good in muddy conditions, but offer far better trail manners than the Mudzilla's. Very good all conditions tires.
The Pitbulls are also very good overall tires. They excel in almost all conditions. Arguably the best, most well rounded tires in the list above. Extremely high quality tires. That quality comes with a price. They are expensive.
The OG Bighorns are one of the best, most durable trail tires on the market. Have been for years. While they can hold their own in loose conditions, they are not mud tires. But they were not designed or marketed as that.
ITP Terracrosses are on par with the Bighorn's.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,027 Posts
I fully agree with Pitbulls being a well rounded tire. I have friends with the BHO. They are not as tough as the Pitbull Growler Uber XOR. Helped plug many punctures. They don't seem to last as long. We have 14k on one set with 50% thread left.
At Discount tires site Just priced a a full set of Pitbulls a $633.00 delivered. I also price the BHO as close to the same size as possible. $603.00 delivered.
The choice is very simple. A much better tire for 30 bucks more.

My 2.062¢
 
  • Like
Reactions: dezz and Vincent

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
My old 550 wearing Pitbull growlers. These are still rolling strong at 4000 miles in some very rough terrains. Zero plugs or damage

I would suggest the 25.5s as to help keep the weight down...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I fully agree with Pitbulls being a well rounded tire. I have friends with the BHO. They are not as tough as the Pitbull Growler Uber XOR. Helped plug many punctures. They don't seem to last as long. We have 14k on one set with 50% thread left.
At Discount tires site Just priced a a full set of Pitbulls a $633.00 delivered. I also price the BHO as close to the same size as possible. $603.00 delivered.
The choice is very simple. A much better tire for 30 bucks more.

My 2.062¢
Which Pitbulls did you price? which size did you price? It looks like there are different models but even their website doesnt seem to show them all?

I couldnt find a weight on these tires as well. Are they too heavy for a 550?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
My old 550 wearing Pitbull growlers. These are still rolling strong at 4000 miles in some very rough terrains. Zero plugs or damage

I would suggest the 25.5s as to help keep the weight down...
Which model growler are these? I was gonna get wheels as well but I might just get tires and call it good. Did you mount the tires yourself?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
Which model growler are these? I was gonna get wheels as well but I might just get tires and call it good. Did you mount the tires yourself?
Garage installed them.

These are the bg2.5 important version of the Growlers. 6 ply 26x9 fronts (29lbs), 26x11 rears (37lbs) . They are quiet heavy, and in my opinion, required clutch mods to help the little 550 pull them. Hence why I suggested the slightly smaller but lighter 25.5 x8 (23 lbs) and 25.5 x10" (32lbs) version.

With a coop45 machined sheave, the off the line pull was much improved with my heavy 26" Growlers in the case of my 550

I avoid aftermarket wheels as they tend to be much heavier then stock wheel. The stocks are lights as heck, fronts 12x6" weigh 5 lbs, rears 12x7.5 weigh 6 lbs.
 

·
Grizzled
2014 Yamaha Grizzly 700 EPS
Joined
·
3,714 Posts
ITP Terracrosses are on par with the Bighorn's.
From personal experience with the Terracross tires, you could not pay me to run those again. My personal opinion is they were very sub-par for traction in standard dry, hardpack with loose on top conditions or in snow. BigHorn OGs are far superior. But that is just one person's opinion.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,737 Posts
26" Original Bighorns, call it good for the decade.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,960 Posts
26" Original Bighorns, call it good for the decade.
Everybody likes their tire choice.
Was the choice based on economic (married on a limit)?
Or were the tires on the bike when bought?
Or did very specific conditions in their riding area dictate the choice?
As for the O.G.'s (that are the best in all but peanut butter mud and wear like iron in the tough stuff) these tires also have characteristics/history some don't know.
These tires came on the stock popo R.Z.R. machines for years, 900# turds (or at least in this area) that are used as rentals mostly, with some machines bought for farm hands in the valleys and to used by elderly residents from the local nursing home on their one a day a month field trip outing.
Anyway.......a rental store could stuff two fat chicks from New York city in one of the 800's, then they could go by their lodging to get the ice chest and warm clothes so when they left town the gross weight could be14/15 hundred pounds.
And what was carrying the load? was the O.G.'s.
I've seen two of these overloaded popo's fly off the mountain with the brakes on fire, but the tires were still good when it hit the canyon floor.
I've towed several these machines off the mountain back to their trailer, with c.v.t. problems and radiators leaking, but the tires were still carrying the load.
As these tires are good on heavy machines, they work great on our A.T.V.s
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Everybody likes their tire choice.
Was the choice based on economic (married on a limit)?
Or were the tires on the bike when bought?
Or did very specific conditions in their riding area dictate the choice?
As for the O.G.'s (that are the best in all but peanut butter mud and wear like iron in the tough stuff) these tires also have characteristics/history some don't know.
These tires came on the stock popo R.Z.R. machines for years, 900# turds (or at least in this area) that are used as rentals mostly, with some machines bought for farm hands in the valleys and to used by elderly residents from the local nursing home on their one a day a month field trip outing.
Anyway.......a rental store could stuff two fat chicks from New York city in one of the 800's, then they could go by their lodging to get the ice chest and warm clothes so when they left town the gross weight could be14/15 hundred pounds.
And what was carrying the load? was the O.G.'s.
I've seen two of these overloaded popo's fly off the mountain with the brakes on fire, but the tires were still good when it hit the canyon floor.
I've towed several these machines off the mountain back to their trailer, with c.v.t. problems and radiators leaking, but the tires were still carrying the load.
As these tires are good on heavy machines, they work great on our A.T.V.s
What are the weight of these tires? Will they bog down a stock 550?
 

·
Grizzled
2014 Yamaha Grizzly 700 EPS
Joined
·
3,714 Posts
@s4bill

@Vincent previously had a 550 Grizzly where I believe he ran 26" Pitbull tires and if memory serves me correctly, those are maybe 1 lbs heavier than the 26" OG BigHorns. Vincent can probably give you good insight on what to expect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
@s4bill

@Vincent previously had a 550 Grizzly where I believe he ran 26" Pitbull tires and if memory serves me correctly, those are maybe 1 lbs heavier than the 26" OG BigHorns. Vincent can probably give you good insight on what to expect.
I did and do run 26" growlers...

Your memory is not serving you well on weights though

Maxxis original Bighorns
26x9 -23 lbs
26x12. -30 lbs

Pitbull Growlers bg2.5
26x9. -29lbs
26x11. -37lbs
 

·
Grizzled
2014 Yamaha Grizzly 700 EPS
Joined
·
3,714 Posts
Thanks for the correction. I thought I recall those Growlers being heavier but per what you listed, those are significantly more heavy :oops: Also, the Pitbulls are 8-ply versus 6-ply on the BigHorn OGs.

Anyway, user s4bill was curious what to expect on a stock 550 with much heavier tires than what he is currently running. Thanks.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top