Yamaha Grizzly ATV Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2007 Grizzly 700 FI/PS and stock size tires. I'm trying to decide how stiff or soft to set my shock spring setting. Trail riding can include rather steep inclines, riding on a hillside parallel to the slope, tight turns at slow speed, dirt and rocky soil, and at times with a deer on the front rack. While I know my bile is for one rider I may have another with me at times.
Second question: what's the downside to a stiffer rear setting and a softer front setting?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
It's a preload setting. It's going to depend on the weight you carry and that weights distribution. I have a 2018 kodiak 700 se, during dealer pdi, they set mine at 3 front & rear. I'm a big boy, first ride our, i can't back and bumped them up to 4 front and rear. Much better until i added my 2up seat/storage box loaded with necessities such as tools, axe, tp, compressor ect. I only ride single, but the option for 2 is there if i need it.
That extra weight magnified an understeer issue i could notice from factory. I started researching it, she started playing with air pressures, and then on a stock car racing site, i read that reduced preload can put more downforce on the tire/axel in question.
So i set my fronts to 3, rears are at 4. It dramatically reduced my understeer issue. A more my bike sits almost level. The rear preload at 4 handles the extra weight on my storage box seat, the fronts at 3 are soft enough to dig tires in to steer, all around a very nice ride with tires set to 6psi all around..

Edit: i corrected it to understeer.... Don't type when your tired. Lol

Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's a preload setting. It's going to depend on the weight you carry and that weights distribution. I have a 2018 kodiak 700 se, during dealer pdi, they set mine at 3 front & rear. I'm a big boy, first ride our, i can't back and bumped them up to 4 front and rear. Much better until i added my 2up seat/storage box loaded with necessities such as tools, axe, tp, compressor ect. I only ride single, but the option for 2 is there if i need it.
That extra weight magnified an over steer issue i could notice from factory. I started researching it, she started playing with air pressures, and then on a stock car racing site, i read that reduced preload can put more downforce on the tire/axel in question.
So i set my fronts to 3, rears are at 4. It dramatically reduced my oversteer issue. A more my bike sits almost level. The rear preload at 4 handles the extra weight on my storage box seat, the fronts at 3 are soft enough to dig tires in to steer, all around a very nice ride with tires set to 6psi all around..



Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
Thanks. I have my preloads set on the #2 all around. I think I'll up the rear to #3 and try that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
Front and rear shocks have different preload settings, but left to right should idealy match unless you are strictly racing, or for some reason, have an extremely heavy load on one side, which is very doubtful.

Let us know how you make out increasing the rears.

Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Front access rear San have different preload settings, but left to right should idealy match unless you are strictly racing, or for some reason, have an extremely heavy load on one side, which is very doubtful.

Let us know how you make out increasing the rears.

Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
Will do. Thanks again.
Blessings, Dave
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,877 Posts
Here is a post that may interest you.
I run my rears shocks full up on the stiffest setting and the front one notch softer.
Also toe-in set to zero. This setup helps make corner drifting easier, reduces the front dive and rids most of the hard cornering plow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for sharing this. Great info. My concern is the front feeling light going up inclines. I realize that is physics but I'm looking for a way to reduce that and stiffening the rear looks to be my answer. I'm 5'-10" and weight 250. Add my rifle and back pack plus the gear (sheave, ropes, heavy duty carabiners, and at times a rack in the rear hitch and the back is heavy. Side to side it doesn't feel "tippy".
 

·
Grizzled
2014 Yamaha Grizzly 700 EPS
Joined
·
4,112 Posts
What you describe is exactly the reason I prefer to put heavy/heavier items on the front rack and not in my back storage box. Two gallons of fuel and all of my heavier extraction gear goes on the front rack. Lighter stuff in the rear box. I also use the info that @reogem linked in the thread and then make small adjustments to what suits you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If I get a deer I load it on the front rack. That's why my set up is like I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My wife and I took a ride and with the rear set on #3 and the front on #2 it handled great. She weights 120#. The front doesn't feel as light and corners better. Thanks again to all.
Blessings, Dave
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
928 Posts
I find the Grizzlies a bit light in the front at times, seems it carries the weight more favoring the rear of the machine not center, your factory springs will last about 2-3 years at most, you will find them sagged out and your riding at your highest setting if you put any amount of miles on, my factory rear springs completely sagged out from trail riding and towing a trailer to the camp in a couple of years, my front springs seemed fine, I installed highlifter 2 stage springs on my rear shocks and has made a huge difference, still have the ride and able to keep my ride height when towing a loaded trailer or two up once in a while, still lots of adjustability, I would say my handling has improved also with these springs.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top