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I'm one of the many in the market for a new UTV. Many of my friends have Rzrs with the 5 link trailing arm setup (or whatever it is exactly). I know the new Wolverine has a A-arms. I tend to do more trail, rock climbing, creek crossing, getting over logs etc. Isn't the A-arm setup a lot more beneficial for this type of riding than some of the trailing arm setups. I can see the trailing arms being great for dunes and more open areas where clearance (getting over things isn't a great need) but for woods, rocks, snow and creeks it would seem to me A-arms are far more advantageous. Thoughts?
 

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My thoughts are about like yours. The guys with the RZRs that I ride with hammer those trailing arms on everything.
 

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The conventional a arms offer a decent amount of GC. Arched a arms offer a little more, like used on the older grizzlies (dont think they use them on the new 700s?) The link suspension doesnt offer as much ground clearance because of the links. Usually RZRs and such need to run aftermarket ones if they ride in the rough alot, as they get bent and beat up pretty quick. I personally like the TTi rear suspension used on the canam atvs, offers the positives of a link suspension (no change of suspension geometry throughout travel) without the loss of ground clearance like an a arm.
 

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Grizzrider, you posted an excellent explanation of the suspension systems.
I also like the Can Am TTI rear suspension design. Like everything, it does have its negatives as well. But overall it's one of my more favorable suspension systems
 

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I agree. Of all the systems the conventional A arm is easiest to work on, its tried and true for many years. Its durable, holds up as long as you do some preventative maintenance. The newer TTi used by canams on the G2 platform is MUCH better than the TTi used on the older G1 atvs. The G1s had an internal torsional swaybar. There were lots of issues with it... now they went to a standard external swaybar like used on everything else which got rid of most of the issues. The biggest issue ive found with the TTi is bushing quality... HORRIBLE! Replaced all mine with aftermarket and its fixed now, but with 250 miles on the atv is was squeaking and creaking bad, even after being pumped full of grease after every ride.
 

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I ride with a handful of RZR's with Trailing arms, while in certain situations they work well, they constantly get hung on stuff and beat the crap out of them, not to mention they have to replace the linking bars on the back for high clearance ones seeing as they get bent the first ride. All in all for trail riding I think the regular IRS suspension you find on a lot of machines works better, for racing situations or desert stuff, the trailing arms work best.
 

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Seems to me that the link setup gets tore up really bad in even slow rollovers. I have no complaints on my Maverick's a-arm set up. I trail ride and occasionally tackle some slowly technical stuff (plan on hitting more of that up this year)

 
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