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Hi I have had a mechanic replace the one way bearing and the rollers in the outer inertia primary clutch. I then found the outer clutch cover very hot (can't hold your hand on it) and smoke coming from the vent. I pulled it down and found the inner sheave fully stuffed as the splines had been cut out and not driving off the shaft. So I put the heat and smoke down to friction from the stuffed sheave. I have replaced it with Genuine and shimmed it with approx 1.5mm shim. It ran well before it was all covered up. All back together and the heat around the clutch cover seems to still be there. It is a hot day here today 42 degrees but unsure wether this is normal, residual heat from the engine or still something not right?? Any help appreciated. The mechanic isn't really worth a knob of goat [email protected]#T!!
 

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The clutch covers can and do get hot. Whether yours is abnormal or not I can't answer without actually being there.
The smoke from before was because of the stripped inner sheave splines. If only the outer sheave is turning, it will burn the belt.

The inner sheave splines probably stripped due to improper installation of the primary clutch, most importantly not using a torque wrench. Probably just put it on with the impact gun.
 

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I put the shim on the inside of the inner primary, Then the cylindrical roller than the outer. Is that the correct order? What torque is required for the outer nut? I tapped it tight with a wrench and hammer and used Loctite. Cheers TS
 

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The shim is installed between the cylinder roller and the inner sheave (meaning between the clutch sheaves). Just watch YouTube videos of it. Lots of them on there.

The proper torque is based on what model of ATV you have. I can't see a signature if you have one, so I have no idea what you have.
 

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100 ft/lbs is the proper torque.

When you install the washer before the nut, make 100% sure it is centered over the splines. If not, when you install the nut, the washer will fetch up on the edge of the splines. This will come free during use, and all torque will be lost....bad things always come when this happens. And it all happens very quickly.

Edit:
I originally had 85 ft.lbs posted. This was I correct. That is the torque for a 660 model.
 

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I've just pulled it down again as I didn't think it's right. The inner primary spline is cut out again. and the inner sheave free spinning and loose. When I initially installed it I returned everything as I had found it. I have now realised that the mechanic had not put a washer behind the 22mm locking nut of the primary clutch. I can also see chaffing against the face where the nut would make contact with the outer primary. I'm thinking the outer has moved off the spline against the nut therefore not driving and all the torque has gone onto the inner sheave and that's what's caused it to cut the spline out. Or is there something else i'm missing?
 

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If the washer is not installed, the nut bottoms out on the splines. This leads into little to no clamping pressure on the cam plate and inner sheave. Without this clamping force, the inner sheave splines has nothing supporting it, and it will strip the splines.
The reason why the inner sheave splines strip is because it is made of aluminum. The cam plate splines at the nut side are made of steel....much stronger.

Additionally to this, you need the factory washer. It is very critical in this application. It is very thick and is supposed to fit perfectly over the splines. Do not use just any washer. It will not work. Use only a Yamaha Part in this application.
 

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The primary clutch pulley is in two halves and each half is called a sheave.
The inner half is the fixed sheave and is under the same clamping force as the cam plate when everything is installed properly. As the washer was left out, you had improper installation allowing the fixed sheave to wobble and wear the sheave splines.
The pulley system is held tight by the secondary spring when all parts are properly torqued but without the washer the cam plate was not tight with only the amount of shim you installed. I suggest you also check the cam plate splines for wear damage.
Many on G.C. have found doing the work them self is better than paying a dealer training a shop mechanic, it sounds like your's was the first bike the mechanic (part changer) worked on.
 

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Man that sucks. You pay a shop what, $75, $95 per hour and they leave parts out? Everybody makes mistakes, but there is no excuse for that. That is just some disorganized clown that thinks he is in a hurry and doesn't give a hoot anyway. I have to say I would be PISSED!!
 

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(Pardon my French) Holy s***! I am glad this thread was brought up. I just put 2mm shim in my grizzly 660. I couldn't remember which sheave the washer goes on, I thought it was the secondary, and figuring it didn't matter to much, so I just bolted it up. I also had no clue you were suppose to torque the nuts. I didn't do this as I (kill me now) just put it on with an impact and made sure it was tight. This is getting fixed later this evening. Thankfully I didn't put everything back together yet.
 

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(Pardon my French) Holy s***! I am glad this thread was brought up. I just put 2mm shim in my grizzly 660. I couldn't remember which sheave the washer goes on, I thought it was the secondary, and figuring it didn't matter to much, so I just bolted it up. I also had no clue you were suppose to torque the nuts. I didn't do this as I (kill me now) just put it on with an impact and made sure it was tight. This is getting fixed later this evening. Thankfully I didn't put everything back together yet.
That's what this forum is all about. And we torque the nutfor several reasons. Being under-torqued will strip the splines. Being over-torqued will strip the threads on the output shaft or the nut. Impact guns a really good at doing that. Proper torque solves all these issues.


And I'll put this out there right now. If you want to know all about clutching or getting the most from your clutching, listen to Ridgway above. He has the experience and knowledge to back up everything he states. He knows what works best and what doesn't. He also has the patience enough to explain it out 10 times over if required to help you out....That's a trait I highly respect.
 
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(Pardon my French) Holy s***! I am glad this thread was brought up. I just put 2mm shim in my grizzly 660. I couldn't remember which sheave the washer goes on, I thought it was the secondary, and figuring it didn't matter to much, so I just bolted it up. I also had no clue you were suppose to torque the nuts. I didn't do this as I (kill me now) just put it on with an impact and made sure it was tight. This is getting fixed later this evening. Thankfully I didn't put everything back together yet.
And you've been giving people advise on clutching?
 
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@Vincent. I can tell people what I think they should do to improve. I have admitted several times before that I am not very knowledgeable when it comes to clutching and I am going off what I have read. I have my Grizzly for about 6 months, please cut me a little slack. As far as the whole impact thing goes, I said I didn't know about proper torque on the nut. I appreciate @dezz understanding.
 

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@Vincent. I can tell people what I think they should do to improve. I have admitted several times before that I am not very knowledgeable when it comes to clutching and I am going off what I have read. I have my Grizzly for about 6 months, please cut me a little slack. As far as the whole impact thing goes, I said I didn't know about proper torque on the nut. I appreciate @dezz understanding.
Trust me. I guarantee Vincent meant no harm or bad judgement in his post. I am sure he was making a joke...adding humour to this thread. Nothing more.
 

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Sorry. I got a lot of smart comments from my riding buddies on this, as well as being frustrated already... I guess that spot was just a little raw.
 

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(Pardon my French) Holy s***! I am glad this thread was brought up. I just put 2mm shim in my grizzly 660. I couldn't remember which sheave the washer goes on, I thought it was the secondary, and figuring it didn't matter to much, so I just bolted it up. I also had no clue you were suppose to torque the nuts. I didn't do this as I (kill me now) just put it on with an impact and made sure it was tight. This is getting fixed later this evening. Thankfully I didn't put everything back together yet.
Using an impact wrench on the primary nut is a touchy subject, so for the most part isn't recommended on G.C.
AND, someone years ago figured out how to build a wooden vise to hold the movable sheave while removing the nut or using a torque wrench to install the nut, so using an impact isn't needed with the vise.
The reason an impact is not recommended is the pounding on the delicate one-way bearing hidden from view. Some members have reported one-way's damaged in shipping, reporting asymmetrical rollers not positioned correctly. These one-way bearings are free wheeling clutches so everything has to be just right. Read about the bearing here;

https://search.yahoo.com/search?fr=mcafee&type=C211US0D20151211&p=one+way+bearing+wiki

If you have used an impact and need to feel if the bearing is working, the primary will lock to the crank through the bearing while being turned in the clockwise direction, and will turn freely in the counter clockwise direction.
 

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Sorry. I got a lot of smart comments from my riding buddies on this, as well as being frustrated already... I guess that spot was just a little raw.
Sometime good intentions can go awry. Many times when someone just starts working on a Griz or anything else for that matter without informed information things can go off the rails. These mistakes can cost a lot of cash. Putting a 5¢ shim just went up to $150-200. Servicing the primary can go from zero to a couple hundred buck by not torquing the nut properly or forgetting that washer.

Most times I want the person with a problem to post more info before suggesting a fix. Some will not post answers, this can get frustrating.

The best first tool a person can buy or otherwise obtain is a factory service manual.
One of our very generous sponsor members oleblue22 has many down-loadable manuals on his website 501 Parts.com Yamaha 4wd System Parts and Repair.
 
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